background image

AMRITA KAUR

Mrs Drishti Dhiraj Bablani believes that 

small acts of kindness can create big rip-

ples which bring about change – some-

thing that can contribute to the better-

ment of society and improve the lives of 

the less fortunate. 

This mindset inspired her to start a 

movement called The Kindness Ripple 

in April last year. It focuses on collecting 

and donating food to charity organisa-

tions. 

“The   inspiration   for   starting   the  

movement was the will in me and many 

people around me to give back to soci-

ety,” said Mrs Bablani, an IT profes-

sional with ANZ bank. 

“I realised that there are many peo-

ple who want to help and give back in 

small ways but most feel what they can 

do is so little that it would not make 

much difference.” 

The 42-year-old wanted to “help peo-

ple see the true power of their humble 

contributions”. 

“I wanted to bring home the point 

that small acts of kindness can create a 

big impact if done collectively, in one di-

rection,” she said.

This year, Mrs Bablani and 36 like-

minded individuals collected and do-

nated 2,010 packs of 5kg rice to Food 

Bank Singapore. 

The initiative got the group into the 

Singapore Book of Records for the 

largest donation of rice to charities col-

lected from the public.

The previous record was held by 

Nam Hong Welfare Organisation when 

it held a charity fair at Northpoint City 

from Aug 31 to Sept 2 last year and col-

lected 700 packs of 5kg rice. 

Last Saturday, Mountbatten MP Lim 

Biow Chuan presented Ms Bablani and 

the 36 volunteers with a Singapore 

Book of Records certificate at the Singa-

pore Sindhi Association and thanked 

them for their efforts in contributing to 

the movement. 

“We can all extend simple acts of 

kindness to everyone. The ripple of kind-

ness which Mrs Bablani started will 

make Singapore a better place for all,” 

said Mr Lim. 

The rice packs were collected from 

April 11 to May 11 and delivered over 

three visits to Food Bank Singapore this 

month. 

Food Bank Singapore collects excess 

food from food suppliers and re-distrib-

utes them to organisations such as old 

folks’ homes, family service centres and 

soup kitchens. 

Following this particular initiative, it 

distributed the rice packs to 10 benefi-

ciaries, including All Saints Home, Sin-

gapore Red Cross Society, Free Food for 

All, Bethel Community Services and 

Hope House. 

Mrs Bablani, who hails from Ujjain, a 

city in Madhya Pradesh, India, recruited 

volunteers by passing the word about 

the movement to her circle of friends 

and family members. 

Some also reached out to her when 

they read about the initiative on the 

Facebook events page.

There were two categories of volun-

teers – those who collected the rice 

packs from donors and those who trans-

ported them to Food Bank Singapore. 

Each volunteer was tasked to collect 

the donations from at least five house-

holds. 

Said Mrs Bablani, a Singaporean: 

“Most of the volunteers approached 

people in their network. They had the 

rice delivered directly to my house 

which was our temporary warehouse. 

“Some volunteers had rice packs de-

livered by donors to their place from 

where   eventually   everything   was  

brought to my house by volunteers.”

Volunteer   Ms   Sneha   Pande,   34,  

reached out to her friends for the dona-

tion drive and collected 55 rice packs. 

She too donated five packs. 

“Donors who live nearby dropped 

the rice packs at my house but some of 

them who live further felt it was trouble-

some to deliver the packs to me. So we 

came up with a system where we col-

lected money to buy the rice packs,” she 

said.

“This was more convenient for those 

who wanted to donate but found it trou-

blesome. We then bought the rice packs 

online from NTUC FairPrice and got it 

delivered to us.”

Such a mass donation and collection 

drive was not without its difficulties. 

Storage and scheduling drops based 

on space availability at Food Bank Singa-

pore’s warehouse was a challenge the 

team faced.

“Food Bank Singapore has limited 

storage space and they have other av-

enues of food collections, so they had to 

manage the timing with beneficiaries to 

pick the rice packs, only then we could 

drop more,” said Mrs Bablani. 

Food Bank Singapore management 

executive Jameson Chow, together with 

his team, was involved in calling the ben-

eficiaries to find out which ones were in 

need of rice as well as the organsing of 

the re-delivery of the rice packs to the 

beneficiaries. 

“I think one of the main reasons Dr-

ishti worked with us is because we have 

many beneficiaries under us that she 

can reach out to with the 2,010 rice 

packs she and her team of volunteers 

collected,” said Mr Chow, adding that it 

was a “wonderful initiative”. 

“The most rewarding part of it was to 

see all the 2,010 packs reach the benefi-

ciaries and today they are providing 

meals to many in need in Singapore,” 

said Mrs Bablani.

“It feels great setting a new record. I 

salute the generous spirit of Singapore-

ans. This record re-emphasises the fact 

that our small contributions can make a 

very big difference. I hope this inspires 

people to keep believing in the power of 

small acts of kindness.” 

Mrs Bablani hopes to organise this ini-

tiative every year. 

This is not her first time working on a 

drive like this. 

Last year, she and 28 volunteers col-

lected and donated 1,300kg of food to 

Food Bank Singapore. 

Last August, she also banded to-

gether with her friends and family mem-

bers to raise $1,577 in support of the 

those affected by the floods in Kerala. 

They bought essential items – such as 

packaged food, clothing and utensils – 

from Amazon online – and sent it to or-

ganisations such as Goonj Foundation 

and World Vision India which were pro-

viding relief to those affected in Kerala.

amritak@sph.com.sg

(Above) Volunteers transporting the rice packs; (below) Mrs Drishti Dhiraj Bablani receiving the Singapore Book of Records certificate from 

Mountbatten MP Lim Biow Chuan.

 

P

H

O

T

O

S

 

C

O

U

R

T

E

S

Y

 

O

F

 

M

R

S

 

D

R

I

S

H

T

I

 

D

H

I

R

A

J

 

B

A

B

L

A

N

I

“I salute the generous 

spirit of Singaporeans. 

This record 

re-emphasises the fact 

that our small 

contributions can make a 

very big difference. 

I hope this inspires 

people to keep believing 

in the power of small 

acts of kindness.”

– Mrs Drishti Dhiraj Bablani, who 

spearheads The Kindness Ripple movement

A record-breaking deed 

SINGAPORE

 

tabla

!

May31,2019

Page5