background image

Netizens can sieve out most 

fake news but government 

action needed in emergencies

SPH, Kajima break ground 

at ‘future Bishan’

R

AIL operator SMRT Corpora-

tion is aiming for no more than 

one delay per month by 2020 – 

at least three times better than its per-

formance today.

At its annual review on March 28, 

chief executive Desmond Kuek de-

scribed this as “a bold target”, which 

“only a handful” of the world’s metros 

can match. 

“Our goal is to reduce any delay to 

less than five minutes, and in the worst, 

ensure that it does not last longer than 

30 minutes,” Mr Kuek said.

“It is these major incidents, lasting 

longer than 30 minutes, that we must 

strenuously avoid.” 

Last year, SMRT had nine such ma-

jor incidents, excluding those related to 

a project to change-out the signalling 

system  —  which  determines  how  

closely trains can travel to each other. If 

signalling faults were included, there 

were 13 such long delays on the 

North-south,   East-west   and   Circle  

lines – which are operated by SMRT. 

This was one more than in 2016.

If delays of more than five minutes 

were included, signalling-related de-

lays totalled more than 140 last year, 

going by a chart provided by the 

newly-privatised operator. 

Signalling-related   delays   formed  

the bulk of delays on its lines last year.

Mr Kuek said however, that inci-

dents related to the resignalling project 

were “temporal”, and were thus ex-

cluded in its reliability count.

In  response to questions on when 

signalling-related delays would be in-

cluded, SMRT chairman Seah Moon 

Ming said they should be included 

from end-June, when the new sig-

nalling system is completely opera-

tional on both the North-south and 

East-west lines.

Mr Seah said the early closure and 

late opening (ECLO) of the two lines 

since late last year had provided SMRT 

“nearly three times the engineering 

hours for maintenance, inspection and 

renewal works”.

Asked how long ECLO will con-

tinue, the chairman said it would need 

to continue for at least the rest of this 

year.

“We cannot say forever,” he said. 

“But if there’s a need, we’ll go for it.”

SMRT said that as of February, the 

North-South   line   had   clocked  

447,000km between delays, while the 

East-West line posted 289,000km, and 

the Circle line 564,000km.

Mr Kuek said: “With the completion 

of key projects and stabilising of the 

new signalling system, we’ve seen posi-

tive results in rail reliability.

“While this is encouraging, there’s 

more we can do to drive reliability even 

higher.” 

He noted that the company now 

spends 60 per cent of fare revenue on 

maintenance, up from 50 per cent.

“Going forward, we are gunning for 

zero safety breaches and zero delays of 

more than 30 minutes,” he added.

Altogether... The Woodleigh Residences and The Woodleigh Mall groundbreaking ceremony at the 

construction site attended by top SPH and Kajima Corporation executives together with His Excellency 

Kenji Shinoda, Ambassador of Japan to Singapore (fourth from left).

 

P

H

O

T

O

:

 

S

P

H

,

 

K

A

J

I

M

A

 

C

O

R

P

N

THE local online citizenry is so-

phisticated and can detect on-

line falsehoods quite quickly 

most of the time, but there are 

situations that warrant govern-

ment intervention, said two aca-

demics from the Wee Kim Wee 

School of Communication and 

Information, Nanyang Techno-

logical University.

On a normal day, “low-level 

online trolling” can be easily 

dismissed by local netizens, As-

sistant   Professor   Liew   Kai  

Khiun told a Select Committee 

on deliberate online falsehoods 

on Wednesday. However, in an 

emergency (like a riot) or a ma-

jor event (like an election), the 

Government should step in as a 

lifeguard, he added.

In such cases, the Govern-

ment should issue take-down 

notices of falsehoods and con-

duct closer monitoring of those 

who create such fake news, he 

said.

And such steps should not 

be taken quietly, which could 

fan conspiracy theories and sus-

picion, but rather be publicised 

to send a message, he said.

Said Dr Liew: “In future – 

and perhaps even as we are 

speaking now – something that 

is posted online cannot truly be 

taken down, it will always exist 

on some platform. 

“But the take-down princi-

ple is important for expressing 

a strong message... that the Gov-

ernment is serious about this, 

the authorities are acting on it.”

Associate Professor Alton 

Chua agreed, adding: “The tak-

ing down itself cannot be done 

in isolation of other measures. 

It has to be publicised on main-

stream media.” 

Both professors also argued 

for other longer-term measures 

to be implemented.

Dr Liew said: “We have to 

accept a certain level of false-

hood will persist. We cannot 

come up with a new law and ex-

pect religious and racial har-

mony. (Laws) must be supple-

mented by political and admin-

istrative measures.” 

Citizens have to be made 

more aware of how to conduct 

themselves online and what to 

look out for, he said.

For its part, the Government 

must be seen to take action 

when citizens raise complaints, 

because simmering underlying 

tensions can be easily exploited 

by online trolls to spark a crisis, 

he added.

In his written submission to 

the committee, Dr Chua called 

for an expansion of the Na-

tional Education curriculum to 

include the moral, legal and so-

cial implications of fake news to 

“develop digital information 

savviness in our students”. 

He also suggested support-

ing and growing fact-checking 

online communities. 

“A starting point can be 

found in the hubs of existing so-

cial networks, and in particular, 

influential users whose views 

can spread widely within a 

short time,” he noted.

“Working as partners with 

the Government, these users 

serve   as   anchors   in  

crowd-sourced platforms to ex-

pose hoaxes and lies. In this 

way, falsehoods are dealt with 

from both top-down and bot-

tom-up.” 

Rail operator aims to be at least 

three times more reliable by 2020

SMRT: One delay a month, max 

THE first private residential-cum-retail devel-

opment that is shaping up in the new Bidadari 

estate will offer some 680 residential units and 

close to 28,000 square meters of retail gross 

floor area.

The project, being developed jointly by Sin-

gapore Press Holdings (SPH) and Japanese de-

veloper Kajima Development, will also fea-

ture Singapore’s first air-conditioned base-

ment bus interchange.

Condominium units of The Woodleigh Resi-

dences, ranging from two to four bedroom 

units, are likely to be priced at above S$2,000 

per square foot when the development is 

launched, likely in September, sources say.

OrangeTee & Tie and Savills Singapore are 

the appointed marketing agents for The 

Woodleigh Residences.

As for the retail component The Woodleigh 

Mall, it will be retained by the developers for 

recurring income.The mixed-use project by 

SPH and Kajima Development marked its 

groundbreaking on March 28 .

“We aim to transform this parcel of raw 

land into a much sought after oasis for home-

owners to live close to park-land surroundings 

yet enjoy the convenience of a well provi-

sioned and vibrant mall,” said SPH chairman 

Lee Boon Yang at the project’s groundbreak-

ing.

SPH and Kajima Development had in June 

last year tabled a top bid of S$1.13 billion for 

the much-coveted commercial and residential 

site, which is the first Government Land Sale 

site offered in the new Bidadari Estate.

Their winning bid worked out to a land rate 

of S$1,181 per square foot per plot ratio based 

on the maximum gross floor area allowed for 

the 99-year leasehold site.

Widely referred to as the “future Bishan” 

due to its central location, the Bidadari estate 

spanning 93-ha is developed as part of Toa 

Payoh town, bounded by Bartley Road, Sen-

nett Estate, Upper Serangoon Road and 

Mount Vernon Road.

It is envisaged to be “a community in a gar-

den”, with new HDB flats launched in the area 

so far being over-subscribed. Dr Lee noted 

that the development will complement and 

benefit from the adjacent Bidadari Park while 

residents will enjoy views over the Alkaff 

Lake and Bidadari Heritage Walk. 

Page14

March30,2018

tabla

!

 

SINGAPORE