background image

WONG KIM HOH

Senior Writer,

The Straits Times

S

IX years ago, Raju Chellam’s close 

friend found himself in a bad way. 

His wife was suffering from end-

stage renal failure and was in dire need of a 

kidney transplant.

He approached Mr Chellam for help in 

finding a donor because the IT profes-

sional has a deep interest in medicine and 

is conversant with medical procedures.

One day, they received a call from a 

man in Hong Kong. He claimed to be a bro-

ker who found out from the Dark Web that 

Mr   Chellam’s   friend’s   wife   critically  

needed a new kidney.

The Dark Web is a part of the Internet 

that can be accessed only with special soft-

ware. It is used by, among others, activists 

and those engaged in illicit activities to by-

pass Internet surveillance.

Mr Chellam recalls: “He said he could 

find us a kidney, a doctor and a hospital for 

the transplant operation. He asked for 

US$50,000.” His friend was so desperate, 

he got Mr Chellam to pursue the lead.

“I asked the broker a lot of questions. 

‘How are you going to do tissue typing? 

How do I know the kidney you’re getting 

is the right size? In which hospital are you 

doing the transplant? How do I know if the 

doctor is a transplant surgeon? What if my 

friend’s wife came back with HIV?’”

“He said: ‘Boss, you want a kidney, I 

give you a kidney. Don’t ask me all these 

questions. If you want to ask these ques-

tions, go the legal way’,” says the 60-year-

old.

Mr Chellam advised his friend against 

taking up the offer. 

“There was no guarantee that she 

would get a good doctor who knew what 

to do, that the kidney was infection free or 

that she would get the right platelets. It 

was too risky. I told him that he could lose 

both his money and his wife,” he says.

His friend’s wife died several months 

later. The episode, however, piqued Mr 

Chellam’s interest in illegal organ trading. 

He started doing extensive research, an ac-

tivity made more poignant and resonant 

by the health issues that his wife – a heart 

patient – was and is still grappling with.

What he unearthed prompted him to 

write a medical thriller, Organ Gold – the 

tale of an American teen savant who goes 

into a coma after a fall in Singapore and 

the moral dilemma his parents find them-

selves in after a broker makes them an of-

fer for his organs.

The book is replete with fascinating 

nuggets from Mr Chellam’s research, from 

the role each player in the chain plays to 

how much they make and the prices differ-

ent organs command.

It is a multimillion-dollar global busi-

ness, he says. It is perhaps apt that Mr Chel-

lam should write Organ Gold. After all, it 

taps all his skill sets.

Kicked out of medical school because 

he was too poor to afford the fees, he has 

been, over the years, a journalist, an entre-

preneur and a high-flying tech profes-

sional. 

Now a Singapore citizen, he was born, 

the elder of two children, in New Delhi. 

His father was a secretary; his mother, a 

school teacher.

A premature baby, he was left in the 

care of his maternal grandmother in a 

gangster-infested village on the outskirts 

of then Bombay (now Mumbai) where he 

spent most of his childhood and adoles-

cence.

When he was four, he came down with 

a 40.5 deg C fever, one which left him blab-

bering. He was warded in the intensive 

care unit of a local hospital where he was 

given an injection in the leg with a dirty sy-

ringe. His leg became badly infected. For 

nearly two weeks, he was critically ill.

The delirium, he claims, gave him an un-

usual numerical ability, one which he 

demonstrates by writing down the first 88 

digits of Pi – the most widely known math-

ematical constant – from memory.

He was no goody two shoes. In his 

teens, he hung out with the local hood-

lums who smuggled watches and boski – a 

type of fabric – from Dubai. He often plot-

ted routes, he says, for his gangster friends 

to evade the police. 

Out of the “dirty dozen” who were his 

chums, nine are now dead, “killed by cops 

or other gangsters”.

His father’s chronic health woes of dia-

betes and high blood pressure meant the 

family lived from hand to mouth and were 

often in debt.

In 1983, they were evicted from their 

rented apartment when the local bank re-

possessed the premises.

“The bailiff came when no one was 

home and threw all our belongings on the 

road,” he recalls. 

For nearly a year, they lived with rela-

tives before moving into a building which 

was under construction and had no elec-

tricity or water supply.

“The shame and the stress led to my 

dad dying of a heart attack that year,” he 

says soberly.

Fascinated by medicine from a young 

age, he got into medical school but was 

told to leave when he could not pay his 

fees. 

He ended up majoring in statistics and 

economics at Bombay University. In his fi-

nal year, he took a one-year course in jour-

nalism at the Bombay School of Journal-

ism. 

After graduating in 1980, he secured 

an internship at the Times of India. His 

first story, about unfiltered smoke from a 

crematorium triggering a spike in asth-

matic attacks in a densely populated area, 

made the front page of both The Evening 

News and Times Of India.

But it also earned him a menacing call 

from a politician, who threatened to break 

his legs. 

In 1981, his bosses transferred him to 

sister paper The Economic Times, where 

he started the country’s first computer col-

umn, and later, a science column. After 

seven years, he left to start a consultancy, 

CompuStyle. When that went bust within 

a year, he became editor of India’s first 

computing magazine, Dataquest.

By then, he had met and married 

Madam Uma Ramachandran, a defence re-

searcher with a master’s in biochemistry 

and molecular biology from the Univer-

sity of Delhi. They were introduced by a 

friend. 

Mr Chellam was fascinated by the fact 

that she had had an operation for mitral 

stenosis, a narrowing of the heart’s mitral 

valve which blocks blood flow into the or-

gan’s main pumping chamber.

“I spent the first half hour asking her 

about her condition,” he says with a 

laugh. They got married in 1989, and 

have a daughter, now 29, working in IT in 

San Francisco.

Mr Chellam’s career went through sev-

eral ups and downs after his two-year 

stint at Dataquest. An opportunity to be-

come managing director of Gradiant In-

foTech – a tech consultancy – brought 

him to Singapore in 1993. Although it 

did well initially, the 1994-1995 cur-

rency crisis stopped it dead in its tracks.

“It was a big failure. I had to sell the 

company with all its liabilities for $1,” he 

says with a sigh. He was, he says, almost 

bankrupt when he was introduced to for-

mer Business Times journalist Kenneth 

James, who helped him land an inter-

view with the paper.

Mr Chellam, who became a Singa-

pore citizen in 1997, worked with The 

Business Times for 10 years, eventually 

becoming its IT editor. He left the paper 

in 2005.

There were a few less-than-successful 

attempts at entrepreneurship but he also 

chalked up a couple of impressive entries 

on his resume. 

Most notably, he was Dell’s head of 

big data, cloud, healthcare and govern-

ment for South Asia for six years. He is 

now vice-president of new technologies 

at Fusionex International. 

Even as he beefed up his credentials as 

a journo and techie, his interest in 

medicine never waned. 

Mr   Chellam,   who   liked   visiting  

trauma wards in hospitals when he was 

growing up, has a collection of medical 

books and can rattle off intricate details 

of his wife’s health woes.

Since arriving in Singapore, Madam 

Uma has gone through two operations 

for her heart condition. The last one, per-

formed at the National University Hospi-

tal in 2016, involved replacing her mitral 

valve with a mechanical one.

“At one point, the doctors were dis-

cussing if she needed a heart transplant if 

the procedure didn’t work,” he says of his 

wife, an adjunct lecturer in chemistry at 

Temasek Polytechnic for 20 years. 

By then, he was already intensively re-

searching organ trading on the Dark Web 

for Organ Gold. “Even hearts are avail-

able. You do know that if you need a 

heart, somebody will have to be killed, 

right? And people are willing to kill for 

you for money,” he says ominously.

It explains why he has a poser on the 

cover of his book: “When death is at our 

door, will we choose to die? Or live to 

kill?” It’s a question which took on 

added resonance when his wife was diag-

nosed with uterine cancer two years ago. 

Treatment led to complications with her 

kidneys and bladder and a stay of more 

than two months in hospital. When the 

question was thrown back to him, he 

says: “I don’t think I would do it... be-

cause I’m medically literate. The risk of 

failure is very high when you do it ille-

gally.”

Mr Chellam’s research took him to dif-

ferent parts of the world and even in-

volved interviews with three people liv-

ing in the region who had transplants 

with organs procured through the Dark 

Web. One, he says, was transplanted 

with a kidney which was of the wrong 

size and eventually died of multiple or-

gan failure after a few months.

His book also references a 2008 re-

port in The Straits Times by journalist 

K.C. Vijayan of Toni, a 27-year-old In-

donesian man who sold his kidney 

through a Singaporean intermediary to 

an Indonesian woman. The transplant 

was carried out in a hospital here. 

Toni then became a runner for an-

other potential donor but was nabbed 

and imprisoned for abetting an illegal or-

gan-trading   operation,   among   other  

charges. 

The chatty author hopes Organ Gold 

will reignite debate on legalising organ 

trading in Singapore. “It is obvious that 

the number of patients requiring organ 

transplants – mainly kidneys – will con-

tinue to rise, especially in countries with 

a big geriatric population,” he writes in 

his book.

“Isn’t it time for countries to start a 

public   debate   on   organ   trading?  

Wouldn’t it be prudent to discuss possi-

ble solutions that may involve govern-

ment intervention, third-party monitor-

ing and setting up processes to bridge the 

demand-supply gap for human organs?”

Since he started work on Organ Gold, 

he has pledged 25 per cent of his gross in-

come – up from 15 per cent previously – 

to charity, and donates regularly to organ-

isations like Aware, Kwong Wai Shiu Hos-

pital and the Buddhist Free Clinic.

“I will donate all proceeds from the 

sales of Organ Gold to the National Kid-

ney Foundation and top it up 100 per 

cent from my own pocket,” he says.

kimhoh@sph.com.sg

Organ Gold, published by Straits Times 

Press, is priced at $26.75 net and 

available at all major bookstores.

Reigniting the debate on legalising organ trading 

in Singapore... (left) Mr Raju Chellam with his 

book Organ Gold. (Above) Mr Chellam and his 

wife Uma Ramachandran on holiday in Malaysia. 

P

H

O

T

O

S

:

 

T

H

E

 

S

T

R

A

I

T

S

 

T

I

M

E

S

,

 

C

O

U

R

T

E

S

Y

 

O

F

 

R

A

J

U

 

C

H

E

L

L

A

M

A peek into dark world of organ trading

Tech professional 

and ex-journalist 

throws light on illegal 

trade and its risks 

in medical thriller 

“Isn’t it time for countries to start a public debate 

on organ trading? Wouldn’t it be prudent to 

discuss possible solutions that may involve 

government intervention, third-party monitoring 

and setting up processes to bridge the 

demand-supply gap for human organs?”

– Raju Chellam in his book Organ Gold 

Page10

September28,2018

tabla

!

 

tabla

!

September28,2018

Page11

NEWS