background image

RAKHI GHOSH

E

VERY time Malati Murmu holds a

copy of Fagun, the only newspaper in

India that is published in the Santali

language, in her hands she feels a great thrill

and satisfaction.

“The newspaper is the realisation of a

long-cherished dream and for every year we

continue to survive and thrive, I am happy

and grateful,” says the editor-publisher,

who lives in Bhubaneswar, Odisha’s state

capital.

This Santal tribal woman, who hails from

the Mayurbhanj district and did her matricu-

lation in Santali, got the idea of putting to-

gether a publication in her native language

in 2003 when four tribal languages – Santali,

Bodo, Maithili and Dogri – were officially

recognised and included in the 8th Schedule

of the Indian Constitution.

“We marked the occasion by celebrating

Vijay Divas (Victory Day) in Bhubaneswar,

which attracted a 1,000-strong crowd from

our community. It was heartening to see this

strong show of support and so we thought

that Santal people needed something more

to feel connected to each other and their cul-

ture. Whereas there was a body of work in

the form of Santali literature and magazines,

there was no newspaper that could bring

everyday news and views to them. I decided

to fill this void by publishing Fagun,”

Ms Murmu elaborates.

But publishing a newspaper is not easy.

Although her husband, a government em-

ployee, was on board with the idea, the cou-

ple did not have the kind of finances needed

to get such an ambitious project rolling. So

they got in touch with some prominent mem-

bers of their community to invest in the

newspaper and, meanwhile, as word spread,

others interested in contributing got in touch

with her. Subsequently, in April 2008 Fagun

came out with its inaugural edition with a

print run of 500 copies.

“My first readers were from Mayurbhanj,

Cuttack and Sundargarh districts of Odis-

ha,” recalls Ms Murmu, with a bright smile,

adding, “at present we send 5,000 copies by

post across the length and breadth of the

country – from Delhi in the north to

Jharkhand, West Bengal and Assam in the

east to Mumbai (Maharashtra) in the west

and Chennai (Tamil Nadu), Visakhapatnam

(Andhra Pradesh), Kerala and even Anda-

man and Nicobar Islands in the south. Be it

money or content, people from the commu-

nity have been the real pillars of support for

us.”

According to Census 2011, there are

894,764 Santali-speaking people in India.

“Apart from Odisha, there is a sizeable San-

tali presence in other states as well. The idea

behind my newspaper is to ensure that eve-

ry Santali should be able to read in their na-

tive language and stay in touch with their

roots. In Odisha, for instance, most Santalis

study in Odia or English too, so the younger

generation doesn’t know Santali at all.

“While I don’t deny the fact that it is im-

portant to know other, more mainstream lan-

guages in order to progress and do well in so-

ciety, one need not completely lose touch

with one’s mother tongue. The tagline of Fa-

gun is ‘Love Olchiki and Speak Santali’,

which encourages Santalis to love the Ol-

chiki script and speak their language. I feel

it’s important for Santali people to ensure

that their children are familiar with our liter-

ature, culture and traditions,” says Ms Mur-

mu.

In planning the content for Fagun,

Ms Murmu had her task cut out for her.

News items of interest to Santalis had to be

shortlisted, articles and write-ups on a range

of topics had to be collated. Then all these

had to be translated into Santali. The pro-

cess remains much the same even now, sev-

en years later.

“This is a monthly paper so I need to

make sure that the content is engaging and

of relevance. Apart from regular news

items, the editorial, commentaries and let-

ters to the editor, you will find articles, short

stories, poems, a special section for women

and children, information regarding festi-

vals, cultural shows and book releases, as

well as happenings in the community and

achievements and awards received by promi-

nent Santalis. Incidentally, we also publish

the syllabus for college students,” she re-

veals.

Why publish the syllabus? Ms Murmu

elaborates: “The state government has intro-

duced a Santali language syllabus in the Sam-

balpur and North Odisha universities. More-

over, in Mayurbhanj and Keonjhar districts,

where nearly 90 per cent of the population

comprises Santalis, primary school students

are taught in our language. So it’s extremely

useful information for students from the

community.”

Every month, Bhubaneswar-based Gopal

Basra’s wife looks forward to her copy of Fa-

gun, as she can read only in Santali. Within

its eight pages, she not only gets updates on

all the latest happenings in their tribal com-

munity, but she also gets to read and try out

different Santali recipes shared by readers in

the cookery section. Another favourite col-

umn is dedicated to women-centric poetry

to which she is a regular contributor as well.

Apart from being a dedicated reader her-

self, Mr Basra’s wife ensures that their chil-

dren flip through the newspaper so that they

can develop an understanding of their native

language and culture. Like Mr Basra’s fami-

ly, Mr Rambay Hembrum is another regular

Fagun subscriber.

He says: “This monthly paper gives im-

portance to news of our community, which

the mainstream papers usually give a miss.

What is heartening to see is that at the end

of a feature, the publisher mentions the

name and address of the Santali contributor

so that those interested in giving feedback or

connecting with them can do so. In a sense,

Fagun has brought us closer to each other.

We may be anywhere in the country but we

can be connected through this publication.”

Ms Murmu and her team of seven dedicat-

ed editorial staff are encouraged by such pos-

itive feedback. Also, she is enthused by the

fact that Santali people are interested in

sending articles and op-eds in their language

these days. “People in the community do

write op-ed and articles for the editorial

page. It is a good thing for us that the num-

bers of those sending good articles in our lan-

guage is increasing and that they are taking

such personal interest in maintaining the

quality of the publication,” she observes.

One regular contributor to Fagun is

former state minister Droupadi Murmu. She

says: “The newspaper has given us Santalis a

platform to write on various subjects in our

own language. A person’s mother tongue is

usually his strongest language of expression

so if one gets the chance to write in that then

the article instantly strikes a chord with a

number of readers.”

Ms Murmu is extremely proud of her lega-

cy and hopes that Fagun continues to help

Santalis stay connected to their unique herit-

age that seems to have been overshadowed

by popular culture today.

Women’s Feature Service

Helping

Santalis

stay

connected

Her pride and joy... editor-publisher

Malati Murmu with a copy of Fagun. 

PHOTO:

WFS

Malati Murmu’s newspaper is the

only paper in India

published in that language

Page 4

April 24, 2015

tabla

!

 

tabla

!

April 24, 2015

Page 5

INDIA