background image

AMRITA KAUR

Not many children know what they 

want to be when they grow up. But from 

young Mr Subaraj Rajathurai was cer-

tain about what he wanted to pursue for 

the rest of his life. 

As a child, he enjoyed making scrap-

books with pictures of animals and was 

familiar with conservation icons. 

He read books on nature and wildlife 

by British naturalist Gerald Durrell and 

watched documentaries by French con-

servationist   Jacques   Cousteau   and  

British broadcaster and naturalist David 

Attenborough. 

It was the closest experience he had 

to being in the wilderness. 

“That was my world because I didn’t 

have opportunities to explore nature 

like children do now,” said the 54-year-

old. 

Though Mr Rajathurai was born with 

a keen interest in wildlife and nature, he 

did not have it easy coming from a con-

servative household. His parents and 

two siblings had little interest in those ar-

eas except for the occasional trips to the 

zoo. 

“I had to hear a lot from my family 

members and relatives that I was wast-

ing my time; because in my generation, 

children were brought up to be doctors, 

lawyers or engineers,” he said 

But he stubbornly stuck to his pas-

sion and dreams. He went to Tanjong Ka-

tong Technical School and graduated 

with an O level certificate before going 

to a pre-university institution, Stamford 

College. 

However,   his   career   in   zoology  

ended prematurely when he was asked 

to dissect a frog. “I couldn’t do it. I can-

not even bring myself to step on an ant, 

so I had to find a different path,” said 

Mr Rajathurai. 

He also decided that he did not want 

to work with captive animals, so a job in 

the zoo or bird park was out of the ques-

tion. After he dropped out of college, he 

went to do his National Service (NS). 

For five years after NS, he wandered in 

areas such as Bukit Timah Nature Re-

serve and Pulau Ubin learning about 

flora and fauna. 

He would take notes, go to the library 

and spend afternoons researching on 

what he found. “That created the founda-

tion I operated from,” said the self-

taught naturalist. In 1988, he took a 

small group to a nature reserve under 

the Nature Society (Singapore) and 

found the experience to be “very re-

warding”. “You get to show people what 

you love and they share that love. It’s re-

ally enjoyable watching them get ex-

cited, so I decided that would be some-

thing I’d like to do,” he said. 

It provided the impetus for him to 

take up a six-month course at the Singa-

pore Tourism Board to get a tour guide’s 

licence. “I learnt everything about Singa-

pore but nature,” he said with a laugh. 

“You have to go through it if you 

want to be a guide, so I learnt everything 

about the country from its history to its 

culture. The idea of getting that licence 

was to start doing general nature tours 

for the public, schools and tourists.” 

He was employed at the age of 25 as a 

freelance nature guide and became Sin-

gapore’s first professional tourist guide 

specialising in eco-tourism. 

“The same people who thought I 

wouldn’t amount to anything much 

were then asking me to take them on 

tours,” he recalled. His family members 

have also become nature enthusiasts. 

Since then, Mr Rajathurai has de-

signed and run over 50 different tours in 

Singapore. The tours help people ex-

plore   and   understand   nature   and  

wildlife. 

“It can range from someone coming 

from overseas wanting to see a particu-

lar type of bird to someone who is just cu-

rious as to what a rainforest would feel 

like,” said Mr Rajathurai, who has often 

been referred to as the king of the jun-

gle. 

On his trips into the wilderness, he 

typically dons a polo tee and loose cargo 

pants and wears a bandana from his 

100-piece collection to protect his head 

from the heat. 

To formalise his work, he founded 

Strix Wildlife Consultancy in 1998, 

which does research, wildlife surveys, 

educational outreach, eco-tours and 

other work in conservation. 

The nature and wildlife expert is 

booked one to three months ahead for 

tours and conducts them about two to 

five times a week while juggling his con-

sultancy projects. 

Mr Rajathurai also started an organi-

sation under the Nature Society (Singa-

pore) called the Vertebrae Study Group 

in 1993. The voluntary group studies all 

the animals in Singapore, collects data 

from surveys it conducts and shares it 

with national parks and universities 

here. 

“Today we have a better idea of what 

animals are around, where they are and 

how many there are because of the work 

the group has done,” he said.

Many of Singapore’s nature reserves 

also exist due to the efforts of Mr Ra-

jathurai. 

The   veteran   wildlife   consultant  

helped to work on a proposal to save 

bird haven Sungei Buloh, which had 

been slated for redevelopment. The pro-

posal was submitted to the Government 

in 1987. The wetland officially opened 

in 1993 as the Sungei Buloh Nature Park 

and was eventually gazetted as a nature 

reserve.

Mr Rajathurai was also one of those 

who fought against a proposed golf 

course at Lower Pierce Reservoir. 

He was involved in a study of the im-

pact it would have on the environment 

and highlighted the flora and fauna that 

would be affected by the development. 

“We   managed   to   get   that   plan  

shelved and now the reservoir is still 

around with the boardwalk. People en-

joy it today,” said Mr Rajathurai. “I 

fought against it out of passion because I 

felt it was the right thing to do. There is a 

sense of pride when I look back.” 

More recently, he was in the news for 

threatening to pull out of environmental 

impact discussions with the developer 

of the Mandai nature precinct if he was 

made to sign a non-disclosure agree-

ment barring him from speaking pub-

licly. 

Mr Rajathurai said this following a 

spate of roadkills involving at least five 

native mammals in the vicinity of the 

work site, as secondary forests in the 

area are being cleared to make way for 

two new wildlife parks. 

“That’s   unacceptable.   In   all   my  

projects there have been zero roadkills, 

so how can you not be able to protect the 

animals when you develop? I refused to 

sign the non-disclosure agreement be-

cause if I did, I would no longer be able 

to be the voice for the animals and na-

ture. 

Mr Rajathurai has been rooting for na-

ture and wildlife for 37 years and is deter-

mined to continue doing so.

“You have to stand up and be 

counted. You can’t just sit at the back 

and complain. That’s what we are trying 

to teach youngsters today. They lack the 

confidence, but they have the knowl-

edge and abilities so we’re slowly trying 

to get them exposed because it’s their 

turn.” 

Mr Rajathurai doesn’t have to look 

too far. His sons – Saker, named after a 

falcon, and Serin, named after a finch – 

have been influenced and guided by him 

since they were infants. 

He and his wife, Ms Shamla Jeyarajah 

who works alongside him at Strix 

Wildlife Consultancy, used to take them 

on field trips when they were only a few 

months old. 

“I used to have my second son in my 

backpack and every time I bent down to 

see an animal, there was a danger of him 

flying out.”

Once they became older, they were 

involved in wildlife population surveys 

and   television   documentary   pro-

grammes. 

Now, Saker, 18, is doing his A levels 

at Yishun Junior College and Serin, 23, 

is pursuing a degree in wildlife consul-

tancy and biology and marine biology at 

Murdoch University. 

“Exposing them to nature at a young 

age gave them a sense of responsibility 

to protect the environment. The next 

generation has to take over and con-

tinue the work we have put into play. 

They must come up with ideas we didn’t 

think of,” said Mr Rajathurai.

He believes that one can never be 

done with exploring nature and sees Sin-

gapore’s reserves as a great outdoor class-

room. 

“Nature is a never-ending learning 

process. As I say very often, you can live 

five lifetimes and still not know it all. 

There’re always surprises around the cor-

ner, always something new to discover 

and that makes it a lot fun.”

amritak@sph.com.sg 

Wildlife expert and conservationist Subaraj Rajathurai with the skin of a black spitting cobra. 

P

H

O

T

O

:

 

T

H

E

 

S

T

R

A

I

T

S

 

T

I

M

E

S

“Nature is a never-ending learning process. As I 

say very often, you can live five lifetimes and still 

not know it all. There’re always surprises around 

the corner, always something new to discover and 

that makes it a lot fun.”

– Wildlife expert and conservationist Subaraj Rajathurai 

Off the beaten track

SINGAPORE

 

tabla

!

November23,2018

Page7