background image

The Sunanda case

V.K. SANTOSH KUMAR

S

INGAPORE has had a tremen-

dous impact on Indian politician 

Shashi Tharoor, who lived here 

for three years in the 1980s. And he re-

members most of all the birth of his 

twin sons at KK Hospital.

Mr Tharoor, who is well known as a 

former high-ranking United Nations of-

ficial, politician, author and orator, has 

been back several times, and he still has 

many friends and vivid memories of 

the days he spent here.

But, if he were to pick one memory, 

it would definitely be of the time when 

his sons Ishaan and Kanishk were born 

in Singapore eight weeks prematurely 

in 1984.

“They survived only because of the 

outstanding neo-natal care at Kandang 

Kerbau Hospital,” Mr Tharoor, a mem-

ber of the Indian National Congress 

party, told 

tabla

!

 in an exclusive e-mail 

interview.

“Those initial weeks of their child-

hood, in intensive care but with the su-

perb doctors looking after them, they 

gradually became well enough to leave 

— those memories will always stay 

very close to my heart,” he said.

“There was probably no other coun-

try in Asia at the time, with the possible 

exception of Japan, where they would 

have survived that stage because there 

were poor neonatal facilities in India 

and elsewhere. So, it’s definitely a place 

that is extremely important to me and 

one where I owe a deep debt of grati-

tude to its outstanding doctors and 

nurses.”

Mr Tharoor, currently a member of 

the Lok Sabha, the lower house of the 

Indian parliament, will speak at an 

event in Singapore on April 27.

He arrived in Singapore in 1981 and 

served as the head of the Office of the 

United Nations High Commissioner for 

Refugees (UNHCR) for three years, at a 

time when the Vietnamese boat people 

crisis was at its peak.

Refugees from Vietnam were fleeing 

the country on boats during and after 

the Vietnam war, with many heading 

for Singapore.

His foremost role was to protect and 

assist the refugees, who were picked up 

on the high seas and brought in.

“I came to Singapore as a young man 

(aged 25) and with a huge responsibil-

ity at a very difficult time,” he said.

“It was my job to help negotiate 

their disembarkation, get them into 

refugee camps and look after them, ne-

gotiate their acceptance by other coun-

tries for resettlement and get them off 

to new lives.

“This meant that I was able to put my 

head to the pillow every night knowing 

that the things I had done during the 

day had made a concrete difference to 

real human beings, to their lives. They 

were not statistics or figures on a piece 

of paper. These were people I could ac-

tually see around me. That was amaz-

ingly enriching in all sorts of ways.”

The  biggest   satisfaction   for   the  

young official, who went on to become 

a UN under-secretary-general before 

leaving the organisation in 2007, was 

that he succeeded in resettling a huge 

backlog of Vietnamese refugees.

“There were about 4,400 refugees in 

the   Hawkins   Road   (Sembawang)  

refugee camp,” said the 62-year-old, 

who now mostly lives in Thiruvanantha-

puram, the capital of Kerala state, 

which he represents in the Lok Sabha.

“By the time I left we had got that 

number down to under 400. But the in-

dividual stories have stayed with me.”

One particular incident from those 

days left a deep impression on Mr Tha-

roor, who was India’s minister of state 

for external affairs (2009-2010) and hu-

man   resource   development  

(2012-2014). There was a family with 

an infant and a baby who had been float-

ing in the sea for a prolonged period af-

ter the tractor-engine that was power-

ing their boat had died.

“They were out of food and water, 

subsisting on rainwater and hope,” he 

said.

“The parents slit their own fingers 

and got the babies to suck the blood in 

order to survive. When they were res-

cued by an American ship they were so 

weak they could hardly stand. My staff 

and I broke every rule in the book to 

rush them to intensive care in the hospi-

tal. To see that same family a few weeks 

later, healthy, well-dressed and setting 

off for a new life in the United States, 

was an extraordinary experience.”

Life in Singapore for Mr Tharoor, a 

Malayalee born in London, was busy as 

he operated out of a “very small office” 

at International Plaza with one interna-

tional deputy and five local staff.

“The Singapore I knew was very dif-

ferent from what it is today,” he said.

“For instance, it did not have a 

metro. It still had ‘row-houses’ and 

‘shop-houses’, and a refugee camp!”

During his time here, Mr Tharoor was 

a frequent visitor to Little India.

“I had a lot of meals at Komala Vilas,” 

he said.

“It is amazing to see how many addi-

tional South Indian restaurants have 

come up now. And Hawkins Road 

Refugee Camp, of course, was a place 

where I spent a lot of time. And it no 

longer exists on the map!”

Though he gorged on south Indian 

food at Little India, mee goreng (vegetar-

ian version) is his all-time favourite Sin-

gaporean meal. Mr Tharoor is a vegetar-

ian as he “abhors the idea of consuming 

the corpses of animals”.

He also participated in the functions 

of the Indian Association and Malayalee 

Association and met some of his distant 

relatives here, with whom he became 

close.

“Singapore has a thriving Indian com-

munity, which is of particular value as 

they represent a bridge between the 

ideas, issues and concerns and connect 

us here in India to the world of the larger 

diaspora,” he observed.

However, though Mr Tharoor and his 

then-wife Tilottama (who taught Eng-

lish at Ngee Ann Polytechnic and was a 

freelance writer contributing several ar-

ticles to The Straits Times under the 

name Minu Tharoor) enjoyed them-

selves in Singapore, there was little time 

for “family activities”. They lived at Pan-

dan Valley.

“Well my twins were just a few weeks 

out of intensive care when they left Sin-

gapore for good, so I can’t say we ever re-

ally had a family life in Singapore,” he 

said.

Ishaan, a former senior editor with 

Time magazine, is currently a foreign af-

fairs journalist with the Washington 

Post, while Kanishk is a writer. Both are 

married. Their mother Tilottama, Mr 

Tharoor’s first wife, is now a professor of 

humanities at New York University.

After his divorce from Ms Tilottama, 

Mr Tharoor married Christa Giles, a 

Canadian diplomat  working  at  the  

United Nations, in 2007.

They divorced in 2010 and he mar-

ried Indian businesswoman Sunanda 

Pushkar, who died in mysterious circum-

stances in a New Delhi hotel four years 

later.

After he left Singapore in December 

1984, Mr Tharoor never found his way 

back to the city-state till 1999.

“The place was unrecognisable,” he 

said.

“It is no exaggeration to say that Lee 

Kuan Yew created the Singapore we 

know. He was a remarkable individual, 

a giant who bestrode four decades of 

Asia’s history and transformed the his-

tory of his nation. A visionary who 

thought beyond the limitations of his 

time and his country, an intellectual 

who brooked no cant, had a firm hand 

on his nation’s tiller and who was not 

particularly indulgent of dissent.”

After 1999, he visited Singapore 

more often — at least a dozen times. 

“There was a period when I managed 

to visit every year, at least once a year, if 

not more, but that ended last year when 

I did not come at all,” he said.

Mr Tharoor loved the fact that Singa-

pore was a developed country in the 

heart of Asia and that he could get all 

the first-world comforts without feeling 

entirely removed from the atmosphere, 

the cuisine and the rhythms of life in the 

continent.

“My two previous countries of resi-

dence had been Switzerland and the 

United States, where in those days 

there were no Indian grocery stores or 

Indian music available or restaurants 

selling idlis and dosas,” he said.

“That may seem much less of a big 

deal in today’s cosmopolitan world, but 

believe me, in 1981 it was still a very big 

deal for this transplanted Indian.

“What did I not like (about Singa-

pore)? I’m not being diplomatic – what 

was there not to like? But I was con-

scious that my view of the place was 

that of a privileged outsider, and that I 

was detached from the daily social, po-

litical and rights concerns that local resi-

dents might have.”

He would love to transplant Singa-

pore’s multiculturalism and cosmopoli-

tanism and its sense of civic discipline in 

India.

“While India certainly has plenty of 

the former, increasingly, these stand 

challenged by rising elements of intoler-

ance and bigotry, in stark contrast with 

the spirit of pluralism and acceptance 

that is a hallmark of both our societies,” 

said Mr Tharoor.

“As for the latter, we just don’t have 

much of it in India; we could learn a 

great deal from Singapore’s sense of or-

der and civic responsibility.”

santosh@sph.com.sg

CONTRO-

VERSY 

continues to 

swirl around 

Mr Shashi 

Tharoor over 

the death of 

his third wife, 

Sunanda 

Pushkar 

(right).

The 

business-

woman was 

found dead in 

a suite in The 

Leela Hotel in 

Chanakyapuri 

in the Indian 

capital on 

January 17, 

2014, aged 51.

Doctors at 

the All India Institute of Medical 

Sciences gave a preliminary 

autopsy report that revealed 

injury marks on her body. They 

said these injuries may or may 

not have been a factor in her 

death.

The autopsy indicated that she 

died of a drug overdose, most 

likely a combination of sedatives, 

other strong medicines and 

alcohol.

In January 2015, Delhi Police 

registered a case of murder over 

Ms Pushkar’s death.

A year later, Delhi Police chief 

B.S. Bassi indicated that she could 

have been poisoned.

Recent media reports in India 

have speculated that the police 

are now ready to charge Mr 

Tharoor with abetment of 

suicide and destruction of 

evidence.

Mr Tharoor has refused to 

comment on the matter.

KK Hospital 

saved his 

premature 

twins

Memories... (Top) Mr Shashi Tharoor with his twins 

Ishaan and Kanishk, who were born prematurely in 

Singapore in 1984.

(Above) His first wife, Ms Tilottama, who used to 

write for The Straits Times as Minu Tharoor.

(Top right) Mr Tharoor at the Singapore Global 

Dialogue organised by the S. Rajaratnam School of 

International Studies on Sept 21, 2011.

P

H

O

T

O

S

:

 

T

H

E

 

S

T

R

A

I

T

S

 

T

I

M

E

S

,

 

I

A

N

S

,

 

T

W

I

T

T

E

R

 

Shashi The 

Roar in 

Singapore

When:

 April 27, 7pm 

(registration at 6.30pm)

Where: 

Singapore Chinese 

Cultural Centre

Speakers and panellists: 

Mr Shashi Tharoor; Mr 

Jawed Ashraf, High 

Commissioner of India to 

Singapore; and 

Mr Vikram Khanna, 

Associate Editor, 

The Straits Times

Organised by:

 Connected 

to India

Tickets: 

$75

Contact:

 Log on to 

https://www.eventbrite.sg

PLAYING CRICKET IN S’PORE: PAGE 14

“Lee Kuan 

Yew was a... 

visionary 

who thought 

beyond the 

limitations 

of his time 

and his 

country, an 

intellectual 

who 

brooked 

no cant...”

— Shashi Tharoor

Page12

April20,2018

tabla

!

 

tabla

!

April20,2018

Page13

NEWS