background image

AMRITA KAUR 

When   Singaporean   actor-comedian  

Rishi Budhrani saw an article on the 

e-pay advertisement featuring Media-

corp celebrity Dennis Chew as charac-

ters of other races, he was appalled. 

“There was only a snapshot of the 

ad in the article, so I Googled the ad 

to take a closer look. When I saw it, I 

was like ‘alamak, not again, haven’t 

we crossed this bridge before?’”

The   advertisement   by   E-Pay,   an  

initiative by the government to roll out 

electronic payment solutions in coffee 

shops, hawker centres and industrial 

canteens across Singapore, has been 

considered by many as racially insensi-

tive   for   featuring   actor   Dennis   in  

characters of other races. 

The actor’s skin appears darker and 

he is wearing a lanyard with the name 

“K Muthusamy” printed on the card. 

He   is   also   seen   wearing   a   tudung  

depicting a Malay woman. 

Then Mr Budhrani thought: “Let’s 

say   they   claim   ignorance.   But   how  

long   can   we   play   that   card?   How  

much longer can we say ‘we didn’t 

know’? I think every time something 

like this happens, we get a little closer 

to bubbling tensions, feelings erupting 

and emotional riots.”

Many Singaporeans agreed that the 

advertisement was done in poor taste. 

It was neither entertaining nor funny, 

said Mr Budhrani, 35. 

“The making of the  ad involved  

E-pay,   Havas,   Mediacorp’s   The  

Celebrity Agency and the artiste him-

self.   Are   we   saying   that   in   these  

layers, there was not one person who 

wasn’t from the Chinese community?” 

he asked. 

“There must have been a Malay, an 

Indian or someone from another coun-

try who might have raised the flag and 

questioned ‘are we sure we want to 

put that much bronzer on this guy, are 

we   sure   we   want   to   call   him  

K.   Muthusamy   and   make   his   face  

darker than it is?”

E-payment firm Nets had engaged 

creative agency Havas Worldwide for 

the   publicity   campaign,   which   then  

engaged Mediacorp’s celebrity manage-

ment arm, The Celebrity Agency, to 

cast Dennis as the face of the cam-

paign. They have since apologised. 

Mr Budhrani feels that, while this is 

a   case   of   Chinese   privilege   (where  

since the Chinese population is the 

majority in the country, the race has 

the ‘privilege’ of portraying characters 

of   other   races),   everyone   who   was  

involved should be accountable, even 

if they are not Chinese. 

“Does everybody just fall prey to a 

system now because we thought ‘can 

ah,   should   be   okay,   I   don’t   think  

Singaporeans are so sensitive’.”

Mr Budhrani pointed out the “mul-

tiple   forms,   levels   and   layers   of  

racism”. 

“Racism in Singapore ranges from 

the base level of innocent ignorance to 

deliberate discrimination,” he said. 

“Sometimes, it develops in this way 

from the former to the latter. In that 

aspect, we are actually quite a nu-

anced   and   sophisticated   group   of  

racists.”

To   call   out   the   racism   in   the  

advertisement, YouTuber Preeti Nair 

and her brother, rapper Subhas Nair, 

created   a   rap   video   and   titled   it

K. Muthusamy. 

The two minutes and 50 seconds 

clip is a parody of a new single by 

United States pop stars Iggy Azalea 

and Kash Doll. 

In   the   video,   the   siblings   mock  

Chinese over the “brownface” adver-

tisement and question if it is trying to 

promote the app or stereotypes.

For Mr Budhrani, the video was “at 

the very least entertaining”. 

“Offensive, perhaps,” he said. 

“The   reactions   were   predictable.  

When the Chinese hear the four-letter-

word, see the middle finger, the knee-

jerk reaction is ‘oh my god, this is 

going to cause a racial riot, take it 

down now’.” 

The video indeed created an uproar 

among Singaporeans. Some felt there 

was   nothing   wrong   with   it,   while  

others condemned it and urged for it 

to be taken down. 

Ms Nair, who is also known by her 

moniker Preetipls, and Mr Nair issued 

a   statement   on   their   social   media  

accounts last Friday apologising “for 

any   hurt   that   was   unintentionally  

caused” by the video they created. 

Their “apology”, however, closely 

followed the wording of a statement 

issued   by   the   creative   agency   and  

management company involved in pro-

ducing the e-payment ad. 

On   the   same   day   it   was   posted  

online, the Ministry of Home Affairs 

slammed the statement, saying it con-

tained a “mock, insincere apology”.

“This spoofing is a pretence of an 

apology, and in fact shows contempt 

for the many Singaporeans who have 

expressed  concern at  their   blatantly  

racist rap video,” the ministry said.

The   next   day,   the   siblings   noted  

that people were offended and they 

sincerely apologised for it.

They said in a statement: “If we 

could   do   it   over   again,   we   would  

change the manner in which we ap-

proached this issue, and would have 

worded   our   thoughts   better,”   they  

said, claiming they “only wanted to 

spark a conversation” on the portrayal 

of minority races in Singapore”. 

Home   Affairs   and   Law   Minister

K.   Shanmugam   said   the   rap   video  

aimed to make minorities angry with 

Chinese Singaporeans and had crossed 

the line. 

“If it was something you didn’t like, 

then you ask for an apology. If you 

think it is criminal, you make a police 

report. You don’t cross the line your-

self,” said Mr Shanmugam. 

As a result of the rap video, news 

broadcaster  CNA   removed  Mr   Nair  

from its upcoming music documentary, 

saying it will not associate with individ-

uals who intentionally create offensive 

content   threatening   racial   harmony.  

Mr Nair had worked with Migrants 

Band Singapore, a band made up of 

foreign workers, for the documentary.

Mr   Budhrani  feels  that  removing

Mr Nair from the music documentary 

“sounds like a stretch”. 

“As a viewer, I would like to see his 

work   which   he   wrote   for   National  

Day. He worked with migrant workers 

to   produce   music.   That’s   a   positive  

thing.” 

While Mr Budhrani feels the rap 

video  is   “necessary   to   raise   aware-

ness” on the issue of racism, he feels 

that there are other ways to do it. 

As a comedian, he uses humour as 

a tool to shed light on racially-charged 

issues in Singapore. 

“I like to hold up a mirror for the 

audience, because I feel humour is a 

great digestive. If by telling a funny 

story that’s rooted in truth I can get 

the audience to at least think about 

who we are and what we are doing, to 

me that’s a start.” 

He   feels   that   more   conversations  

should be held on the topics of race 

and racism.

“I’m no policy maker, but I do feel 

that we sometimes end up in a posi-

tion of sweeping things under the rug. 

That brews a lot of tension and you 

may see it manifest in racially-charged 

incidents.”

Mr Budhrani works regularly with 

an   organisation   called   Whitehatters,  

which collaborates with the Ministry 

of Culture, Community and Youth and 

One People.Sg to hold open forums on 

topics such as race and religion with 

the aim to have candid and respectful 

discourse to ask and answer difficult 

questions and learn about how we can 

co-exist peacefully. 

“These   sessions   are   sometimes  

quite heated. However, I’ve seen that 

participants walk away not with ha-

tred or prejudice but with a clearer 

understanding, at least an initial seed 

of effort to understand each other and 

how   their   experiences,   positive   or  

negative, fit into our bigger picture of 

race relations in Singapore.”

amritak@sph.com.sg

 

Singaporean actor-comedian Rishi Budhrani. 

P

H

O

T

O

:

 

K

C

 

E

N

G

 

P

H

O

T

O

G

R

A

P

H

Y

 

“I’m no 

policy 

maker, but

I do feel 

like we 

sometimes 

end up in a 

position of 

sweeping 

things 

under the 

rug. That 

brews a lot 

of tension 

and you 

may see it 

manifest in 

racially-

charged 

incidents.”

– Actor-comedian 

Rishi Budhrani

One man’s take on racism

Page6

August9,2019

tabla

!

 

SINGAPORE