background image

A

S A professor at the National

University of Singapore, it is nat-

ural for me to imagine Singapore

in 2065. By then all my mentees

would be basking in the glory of their

mentees, and I would be 100 if I am

still alive. It is a gamble for anyone to

predict the future. Yet we cannot re-

sist! How Singapore will be in 2065 de-

pends very much on how the world

turns out to be, and which innovations

Singapore absorbs along the way.

Like Singapore, Moore’s Law –

which predicted the future of integrat-

ed circuits, the heart of computing and

smart devices – turned 50 this year.

The co-founder of Intel Gordon

Moore famously made an empirical ob-

servation in 1965 about how the

number of transistors that could fit on

a single silicon chip would double eve-

ry two years thereby increasing com-

puting power and speed. Intel’s latest

chip offers 3,500 times more comput-

ing performance, is 90,000 times more

energy efficient and costs about

60,000 times less compared to its first

generation chip. We now have person-

al computers, smartphones and the In-

ternet. By 2065 I wish to see more

technologies using this law which will

lower the cost of living and make rap-

id improvements in living

standards.

Fifty years from now,

economic growth facilitat-

ed by innovations in fi-

nance, commerce and po-

litical governance will en-

able people around the

world to be glocal (i.e. glo-

bal as well as local) in

their mindsets and work-

places. They would be more con-

cerned about the sustainability of the

world for future generations, influ-

enced by clean water shortages and un-

desirable consequences caused by cli-

mate change. How will these end

points impact Singapore in its transfor-

mation to 2065?

According to Emporis, which lists

the world’s top skylines, Singapore

with 4,562 tall buildings is ranked

third behind New York (6,091) and

Hong Kong (7,794). I imagine that by

2065, Singapore’s skyscrapers will in-

crease and be three times taller than

the current ones with automated car-

park systems and smart home applianc-

es. They will be smarter and enable us

to find the nearest and cheaper car-

parks, efficiently water green spaces,

ensure security, save energy

and handle waste with robots.

Lush green spaces in Singa-

pore will grow and be recog-

nised the world over for their

uniqueness. Singapore will

turn waste into a resource, and

even export it to the world.

Carbon footprinting of prod-

ucts and services will become

the vogue, and building materi-

als and construction methods reimag-

ined to lower the carbon footprint.

Singapore will be monitoring pollut-

ing particles and gases to facilitate

higher standards of healthy, urban liv-

ing. Finance and international trading

aspects of the economy will grow fur-

ther. All electric transportation will go

mainstream and information sent to

our smartphones so we can share rides

and find cost-effective parking spots

and dining places. Drones will deliver

food, groceries and purchases where

and when we need them. Urban farm-

ing and nutritious diets will be fa-

voured by Singaporeans. E-shopping

will be the new normal. We will have

our energy needs met at least up to a

quarter by renewable sources.

Owing to our robust electricity sys-

tem we may become the biggest data

centre of the region and perhaps the

world. We may be supplying clean wa-

ter, clean energy and nutritious food

to the region. We will be mitigating

the rise of the sea level while leverag-

ing on opportunities with the emer-

gence of new shipping and trading

routes via the Arctic.

The World Health Organisation ex-

pects that one in four people in the

world will be above 65. As people pay

more attention to health and well-be-

ing, they are likely to use more medi-

cines and medical devices in addition

to pursuing healthy lifestyles. As

much as a quarter of our body weight

is likely to be various medical devices!

Aside from healthcare innovations,

Singapore will have upgraded ameni-

ties, infrastructure (smart technolo-

gies-enabled walkways, building ac-

cess, public transportation and roads),

healthcare facilities, and opportunities

for learning and skills upgrading.

Singapore in 2065 could be a key

global node for finance, healthcare,

sustainable technologies, dining, enter-

tainment and space tourism. It will be

a leading example of a livable city

with high quality, smart infrastruc-

ture.

Professor Seeram Ramakrishna is the

director of the Centre for Nanofibers

& Nanotechnology at the National

University of Singapore.

Singapore in 2065

Expect smart technologies, healthcare

innovations and upgraded infrastructure

innovation

SEERAM 

RAMAKRISHNA

In association with

Page 6

August 7, 2015

tabla

!

 

NEWS