background image

A

FTER writing a book about ageing, Dr Kan-

waljit Soin has been thinking more about 

death.

“I probably thought a bit more about death also be-

cause my late mother, who had dementia, was living 

with me,” says the 76-year-old first-time author. Her 

mother died last October at the age of 96.

“It was not in a negative way, more about thinking 

about death as part of living and how, while we’re 

alive, we should not postpone thinking about it.”

Dr Soin, an orthopaedic and hand surgeon, is Singa-

pore’s first female Nominated Member of Parliament. 

She is the founding president of Wings, a non-profit or-

ganisation that aims to help women embrace ageing, 

and one of the founding members of the Association 

of Women for Action and Research (Aware). 

Her book, Silver Shades Of Grey: Memos For Suc-

cessful Ageing In The 21st Century, was launched last 

week. It discusses different aspects of ageing, such as 

physical, emotional and mental health, philosophies 

and proverbs about ageing, employment, finances, 

sexuality, death and ageism.

Married to a former High Court judge who now 

works as a consultant in a legal firm, Dr Soin has three 

sons, all in their 40s, and eight grandchildren. 

Her widowed mother preferred to live on her own 

until she had dementia. Madam Satwant Kaur moved 

in with Dr Soin, who has three younger brothers, and 

was with her for the last three years of her life.

“My mother had a good death. I was next to her. 

It’s something we should all hope for, though we can’t 

always plan for it,” Dr Soin says. 

Having a loved one with dementia can be difficult, 

but Dr Soin had some consolation as a caregiver.

“Towards the end, my mother thought I was her 

mother or sister. Initially, it was painful, but after a 

while, it didn’t matter to me. She recognised me as 

someone who loved her,” says Dr Soin, adding that 

she felt privileged to be able to care for her mother.

“Somebody asked me why I was so upset when she 

died, when she did not even recognise me. But I know 

that she’s my mother. Although dementia may be dis-

tressing for relatives, maybe it’s a way for individuals 

to slowly give up connections to the world and want-

ing to hang on to worldly possessions.”

Her mother used to like her gold bangles, but when 

she had dementia, she no longer asked where her jew-

ellery or best clothes were.

Dr Soin says: “She just wanted someone to love 

her. When you hugged her, she would smile. When 

you held her hand, she would kiss it.” 

There is only a brief mention of Dr Soin’s mother’s 

dementia in her book, but she is also interested in its 

wider implications. For instance, she cites research 

into a fondness for slapstick humour when one is 

older, shifting from a habitual liking for satirical hu-

mour, as this may be an early sign of Alzheimer’s dis-

ease. She advocates policy changes such as doing 

away with a mandatory retirement age, with many se-

niors ageing more healthily these days.

A “linear life course”, in which studying is fol-

lowed by working life, then retirement, “doesn’t al-

low you to make the most of your life”, she adds.

A more “cyclical” conception would allow people 

to reinvent themselves by training for different ca-

reers as they grow older, as well as grant them the flexi-

bility to, for example, have children early, before en-

tering the workforce in their 30s.

Dr Soin has sought to bring an “Asian focus” to her 

book, for example, by discussing topics such as the im-

pact of haze on older people, as well as how air pollu-

tion contributes to the risk of having a stroke.

— VENESSA LEE

Now an author... Orthopaedic surgeon Dr Kanwaljit Soin 

with her book, Silver Shades Of Grey: Memos For Successful 

Ageing In The 21st Century. 

P

H

O

T

O

:

 

T

H

E

 

S

T

R

A

I

T

S

 

T

I

M

E

S

Dr Kanwaljit Soin writes book 

on various aspects of ageing

Silver shades of life

Page10

April6,2018

tabla

!

 

SINGAPORE