background image

Singapore leads  Gandhi tributes

Beautiful rendition... (Above) The group of 

women from Singapore singing the Indian 

devotional song Vaishnava Jana To Tene 

Kahiye; (far left) people watching the 

four-minute film on Gandhi at the Suntec 

Convention Centre; (left) Indian High 

Commissioner to Singapore Jawed Ashraf 

releasing the set of postage stamps 

depicting moments from Gandhi’s life.

 

P

H

O

T

O

S

:

 

I

N

D

I

A

 

H

I

G

H

 

C

O

M

M

I

S

S

I

O

N

,

 

S

I

N

G

A

P

O

R

E

,

 

T

H

E

 

S

T

R

A

I

T

S

 

T

I

M

E

S

,

 

T

A

B

L

A

V.K. SANTOSH KUMAR

M

AHATMA   Gandhi   would  

surely have loved it.

A group of Chinese musicians 

from Singapore playing one of his 

favourite songs – Raghupathy Raghav 

Raja Ram – with Chinese instruments.

As the world kick-started the two-

year long celebrations to mark the 150th 

birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi 

on Tuesday, Singapore’s significant con-

tributions towards making the festivities 

a resounding success emerged during an 

event organised by the Indian High Com-

mission (IHC) at the Suntec Convention 

Centre.

India’s High Commissioner to Singa-

pore Jawed Ashraf revealed that two 

videos released by India’s Ministry of Ex-

ternal Affairs (MEA) to highlight the life 

and contributions of the “Father of the 

Nation” had its origins in Singapore.

When Indian Prime Minister Naren-

dra Modi visited Singapore in June this 

year, he unveiled a plaque in memory of 

Gandhi along with Emeritus Senior Min-

ister Goh Chok Tong outside Clifford 

Pier restaurant at Fullerton Bay Hotel 

on June 2.

It was to commemorate the 70 years 

since a part of the Indian independence 

leader’s ashes were immersed in the wa-

ters off Clifford Pier on March 27, 1948.

During the ceremony to mark the oc-

casion, which was attended by more 

than 600 people, the IHC had arranged 

the rendition of the Indian devotional 

song Raghupathy Raghav Raja Ram, 

also called Ram Dhun, which was 

widely popularised by Gandhi.

It was performed by a group of Chi-

nese musicians – Ang Kok Wee, Chen 

Shanhui Indra, Hoong Rozie, Huang 

Ming Xiang and Wong Wai Kit – playing 

traditional   Chinese   musical   instru-

ments.

“Raghupathy Raghav Raja Ram is an 

ode to inclusiveness, multi-cultural rela-

tions, inter-religious harmony, oneness 

of all people and a message of peace and 

brotherhood,” said Mr Ashraf.

According to him, Mr Modi was so en-

chanted by the beautiful and haunting 

tones of the rendition – which was ar-

ranged and conducted by Mr Aravinth 

Kumarasamy, the artistic director of Ap-

saras Arts – that he immediately put it up 

on his Facebook page.

The posting attracted more than 1.5 

million hits.

“Not only that, the Prime Minister 

got us to record it again,” said Mr Ashraf. 

“This time in front of the plaque. And 

the production that we have is marvel-

lous.”

The performance is indeed amazing 

as the group of Chinese musicians cap-

tures the nuances of an Indian song with 

finesse and precision.

Ms Chen, 27, who did the rendition 

with the guzheng, a Chinese plucked-

string instrument, said it was the first 

time she was performing a classical In-

dian music piece. 

“I felt a deep solemness when per-

forming the six-minute rendition (dur-

ing Mr Modi’s visit) and I was surprised 

we managed to grab hold of the audi-

ence’s attention. After the performance, 

several members of the audience came 

up to us and commended us on our beau-

tiful execution.”

She added: “Playing a classical In-

dian song is a symbol of our racial and re-

ligious harmony.” 

Mr Huang, 22, who has been playing 

the pipa, a four-stringed Chinese musi-

cal instrument for the past nine years, 

said: “Performing for this monumental 

occasion made me understand the deep 

spirituality behind Gandhi’s favourite 

song. We had to make sure we rendered 

it accurately and respectfully while 

bringing life and colour to the piece. 

“It took us around a month to figure 

out and prepare for the performance.”

Also on the occasion of the plaque un-

veiling, a group of Indian women sang 

another Indian devotional song Vaish-

nava Jana To Tene Kahiye which, along 

with Raghupathy Raghav Raja Ram, 

formed part of Gandhi’s daily prayer.

“Vaishnava Jana To Tene Kahiye was 

written in the 15th century by the poet 

Narsinh Mehta in the Gujarati lan-

guage,” said Mr Ashraf. 

“It speaks about the attributes of a 

good human being, someone who feels 

someone else’s pain as his own and some-

one who is there to help others but does 

not develop a sense of pride or conceit in 

doing it.

“And that song was so beautifully 

sung by the women in Singapore that it 

triggered a thought in the Prime Minis-

ter’s mind: I want this sung in every 

United Nations member state. Now we 

have contributions from 124 countries 

and the song is a wonderful medley of 

five minutes.”

The five-minute mash-up was re-

leased by Mr Modi during the closing of 

the four-day Mahatma Gandhi Interna-

tional Sanitation Conference in New 

Delhi on Tuesday.

It has voices and tunes from across 

the world, including from the group of 

Singapore women – Aarthi Ajaykumar, 

Chitrapoornima   Sathish,   Gayathri  

Sivaraman, Mundarigi Seshagiri Vidya, 

Srividya   Sriram   and   Sushma   So-

masekharan.

In the days leading up to the 149th 

birth anniversary of Gandhi, Indian mis-

sions and embassies in 124 countries got 

in touch with local artistes and got them 

to sing Vaishnav Jan To Tene Kahiye.

The final five-minute video features 

voices from 40 countries, with every re-

gion of the world being represented by 

short clips of local artistes.

“The result is an eclectic, colourful 

and rich rendition of the hymn infused 

with the local flavor of the region,” the 

MEA said in a statement, adding that the 

“star” of the fusion medley is Baron Di-

vavesi Waqa, the president of the is-

land-nation of Nauru, in the Pacific 

Ocean.

“President Waqa’s gesture was not 

just a special tribute to Mahatma 

Gandhi on his 150th birth anniversary 

but was also a personal gift from him to 

Prime Minister Narendra Modi,” the 

MEA said.

At the Suntec event on Tuesday, 

which was attended by 150 people,

Mr Ashraf released a set of Indian 

postage stamps that depicted the life 

and achievements of Gandhi. 

Later, at the giant outdoor screen at 

the convention centre, a four-minute 

film with key moments from Gandhi’s 

life was shown. 

The visual narrative, using line-art 

style of hand-drawn illustrations lay-

ered with water colour and ink wash, 

symbolises the simplicity that marked 

Gandhi’s life and teachings. 

Mr Ashraf pointed out that “the im-

mersion of Gandhiji’s ashes off Clifford 

Pier is a sacred thread that binds India 

and Singapore – because a place of im-

mersion of ashes in Indian ethos is a 

holy place, a sacred place.

“Now, these two videos, which origi-

nated in Singapore, have made the his-

torical connection stronger,” he said.

Singapore has a fascination with 

Gandhi.   The   Indian   independence  

leader never visited the Malay penin-

sula or Singapore. But when he was as-

sassinated on Jan 30, 1948, there was a 

huge outpouring of grief in Singapore. 

People were touched by him.

When he died, Singapore was en-

veloped by a huge sense of grief with 

some people fasting for 13 days as if one 

of their own had died, according to news-

paper reports of that time.

Said Mr Ashraf: “Gandhiji does not 

belong just to India, but also to the entire 

humanity. He may have been someone 

who was born in India and earned his 

spurs in England and South Africa, but 

his message and his vision are diverse 

and universal.

“He not only led an ancient civilisa-

tion to freedom from colonisation, he 

also perfected the tool of non-violence 

and peaceful resistance. Significantly, 

he inspired so many nations across Asia 

and Africa who began to believe that 

they could also fight for freedom.

“He fought for the fundamental right 

of dignity, equality, justice and equity 

for humans across every conceivable 

identity. 

“It is important to take Gandhiji’s 

message to the youth. His relevance will 

come when the youth begin to see him 

as their icon, their inspiration.”

Mr Ameerali Jumabhoy, who as a 

young man witnessed Gandhi’s Quit In-

dia speech on Aug 8, 1942 at Gowalia 

Tank Maidan in central Mumbai, was 

present at the Suntec Convention Cen-

tre on Tuesday.

The 93-year-old said: “Gandhiji was 

unique, no other leader in the world has 

achieved what he has – free a country 

from the largest colonial structure in the 

world

“Never in the history of the world has 

a non-violent movement been success-

ful. I was fortunate to be born in that pe-

riod. It is important to take Gandhiji’s 

message to our people and our children 

so that they can hopefully make the 

world a better place than what we experi-

ence today.”

The Global Organisation for People 

of Indian Origin, of which he is the chair-

man, is bringing Ms Ela Gandhi, a peace 

activist and Gandhi’s granddaughter, to 

Singapore this week.

The 78-year-old will address the In-

dian community at the India Heritage 

Centre on Sunday, talk about Gandhi 

and what he stood for to the students of 

the Global Indian International School 

on Monday and connect with Singapore-

ans at the Singapore Management Uni-

versity on Tuesday.

santosh@sph.com.sg 

“Playing a classical 

Indian song is a 

symbol of our 

racial and religious 

harmony.”

– Ms Chen Shanhui Indra, 27,

who did the rendition of the song 

Raghupathy Raghav Raja Ram with 

the guzheng, a Chinese 

plucked-string instrument

Page6

October5,2018

tabla

!

 

tabla

!

October5,2018

Page7

NEWS