Page 1
background image

Vijay Sethupathi 

tells fans in 

Singapore he’s open 

to villain roles

REPORTS ON 

PAGES 8 & 9

Get tabla

!

 

delivered to your doorstep. Call 6319-1800 or e-mail circs@sph.com.sg.

Catch us online at www.tabla.com.sg

Tamil actor Vijay Sethupathi at the launch of the new Malabar Gold & Diamonds outlet located at Serangoon Road.

 

P

H

O

T

O

:

 

T

H

E

 

S

T

R

A

I

T

S

 

T

I

M

E

S

I don’t need to be hero

Look out for

THE GOOD LIFE 

supplement in 

next week’s 

tabla

!

MCI (P) 135/03/2018

SINGAPORE, WEEKEND OF FRIDAY, 

DECEMBER 14, 2018

KASHMIRIS FIND 

HOME AWAY 

FROM HOME

PAGE 7

WHAT’S NEXT FOR

MRS NICK JONAS?

PAGE 10

A WIN

FOR TEST 

CRICKET

PAGE 16

Page 1
background image

Tel: 6419 0753 / 6419 0752

E: tours@mustafa.com.sg / www.mustafa.com.sg

Mauritius

Spain

6D North India.................

fr

$1,340

5D Best of Sri Lanka.......

fr

$1,430

4D Maldives....................

fr

$1,540

5D Seoul, Korea..............

fr

$1,470

5D Beijing China.............

fr

$1,550

5D Dubai & Abu Dhabi....

fr

$1,625

6D Turkey Highlights......

fr

$1,980

6D Greece Wonders........

fr

$1,900

5D Japan Tokyo/Hakone...

fr

$2,220

Includes: airfare, apt tax,

4*hotels, meals, tours. Excludes: visa fees, tips & optionals

Priya Varrier is India’s most 

googled person this year 

Malayalam actress Priya Prakash 

Varrier has become the most searched 

personality of the year, according to 

Google India.

The 19-year-old became famous 

after her “wink song” Manikya 

Malaraya Poovi from the film Oru 

Addar Love.

She was followed by actress 

Priyanka Chopra’s husband Nick Jonas 

on the list of most-searched 

personalities. Priyanka was placed 

fourth.

The third and fifth positions went to 

dance performer Sapna Choudhary 

and actress Sonam Kapoor’s husband 

Anand Ahuja respectively. 

Bombay Canteen is India’s 

top restaurant

The Bombay Canteen has been 

crowned India’s best restaurant.

The Mumbai restaurant moved up 

one place from last year to top the list 

at the second edition of the Conde Nast 

Traveller & Himalayan Sparkling Top 

Restaurant Awards.

The iconic Indian Accent restaurant 

in New Delhi was ranked second. 

The winners had to go through a jury 

of 111 tastemakers and experts in a 

process audited by Deloitte Touche 

Tohmatsu India.

Taj Mahal hikes ticket prices

 

The ticket price for Indians to the Taj 

Mahal in Agra has been raised by 400 

per cent in a bid to lower tourist 

numbers and reduce damage to the site. 

International tourists will pay about 

$19 to enter, up from $16. 

Experts say the huge flow of people 

is causing irreversible damage to the 

marble floor, walls and foundations. 

The price hike comes only months 

after Indian authorities restricted the 

number of tourists to 40,000 a day. 

Previously, up to 70,000 people would 

visit the site at weekends.

Tamil Nadu to rename over 

3,000 locations

The Tamil Nadu government will 

rename more than 3,000 locations in the 

state. These include renaming Triplicane 

to Thiruvallikeni, Trichy to 

Tiruchirappalli, Tuticorin to Thoothukudi 

and Poonamalle to Poovirundhavalli.

The decision to rename the locations 

was made after the state’s 32 districts 

set up a joint high-level committee to 

finalise the new names. The committee 

studied suggestions from historians and 

Tamil scholars.

Zomato sacks driver for eating 

customer’s delivery food

Takeaway delivery firm Zomato has 

apologised after one of its drivers was 

filmed eating a client’s food and 

resealing the containers.

The video, filmed in Madurai, shows 

a man wearing a Zomato shirt eating 

food out of the packed orders, then 

resealing them and putting them back 

into a delivery bag. It has sacked the 

delivery man. Zomato said it will 

introduce tamper-proof tapes to seal 

food delivery boxes to prevent such 

incidents from occurring again. 

Nehal’s Miss Universe costume 

features majestic throne

Nehal Chudasama is in Thailand 

representing India at the Miss Universe 

2018 pageant. For the national costume 

round, she will be dressed as an Indian 

warrior princess.

The costume, which weighs 50kg, 

features a portable throne inspired by 

scenes from the movie Rudrama Devi, 

which showcases the Kakatiya Dynasty – a 

South Indian dynasty which was ruled by 

the North Indian Sultanate. 

It was designed by Neeta Lulla and 

Melvyn Dominic Noronha.

The national costume show is a separate 

part of the pageant and does not count 

towards contestants’ overall scores. The 

segment allows the participants to honour 

and celebrate their countries. 

Published by

 Singapore Press Holdings

Editor-in-Chief

(English/Malay/Tamil Media group)

Warren Fernandez

Editor

Jawharilal Rajendran

Contributing Editor

V.K. Santosh Kumar

Write to us at 

tabla@sph.com.sg

Talk to us at 

6319-5510

For home delivery, call 

6319-1800

 

(Mon to Fri 9am to 6pm)

or e-mail 

circs@sph.com.sg

 

Catch us online at

www.tabla.com.sg

Advertise with us by calling 

Kalwant Kaur at 9171-4327

Nishal Rampersadh at 8395-0438

Marketing Team Head

Bernard Ong

P

H

O

T

O

:

 

A

F

P

 

Page2

December14,2018

tabla

!

 

INDIA

Page 1
background image

After suffering an electoral thrashing at the hands of 

Prime   Minister   Narendra   Modi’s   Bharatiya   Janata  

Party (BJP) in 2014, India’s small regional and caste-

based parties are back in the reckoning months ahead 

of the next general elections. 

Losses for Mr Modi’s party in three key states – Mad-

hya Pradesh, Rajasthan and Chhattisgarh – on Tuesday 

– blamed mainly on rural anger at weak farm prices and 

sluggish job creation – have opened the door for new 

and old alliances between the main opposition Con-

gress and smaller parties bitterly opposed to Mr Modi.

One of the smaller parties, the Bahujan Samaj Party 

established in 1984 to mainly represent people in the 

lowest strata of India’s ancient caste hierarchy, said on 

Wednesday it would support the Congress to form gov-

ernments in the big states of Madhya Pradesh and Ra-

jasthan, where it fell just short of a majority.

Congress has the numbers to form a government on 

its own in the central state of Chhattisgarh, while re-

gional parties Telangana Rashtra Samithi and Mizo Na-

tional Front won in Andhra Pradesh and Mizoram, the 

two other states that also went to the polls in recent 

weeks.

However, most political strategists still expect the 

BJP to cling on to national power, albeit with a smaller 

majority, in an election due by May next year. 

But they also acknowledge this week’s results in 

three big heartland states have opened up the outside 

possibility that Congress could stitch together enough 

support from smaller parties to form the next govern-

ment at the Centre. 

“At the central level, Prime Minister Modi main-

tains overwhelming popularity over his competitors, 

and anecdotal evidence suggests BJP has more boots 

on the ground than other parties to mobilise during its 

re-election campaign,” Japanese financial holding com-

pany Nomura said in a research note. “However, we do 

expect talks of a grand (opposition) coalition to raise 

political uncertainty into the 2019 general elections.” 

A Congress-led coalition involving multiple smaller 

parties could find it difficult to govern, and make eco-

nomic reforms particularly contentious. 

That is because almost all the smaller parties have 

their own local or community-based agendas that may 

not fit with many national policies. For investors that 

could mean dealing with more policy uncertainty or 

even gridlock over some critical issues. 

Adding to that uncertainty, Congress says it will not 

announce that its president, Mr Rahul Gandhi, would 

be its prime ministerial candidate in the event that it 

could put together a coalition, as it seeks to respect the 

aspirations of its alliance partners. 

Many of the regional leaders are highly ambitious 

with years of experience in office. 

Mr Gandhi, although heir to the Nehru-Gandhi dy-

nasty that has dominated Indian politics since indepen-

dence, has never held any government position.

On Monday, a day before the state election results 

were announced, the Congress led a meeting of nearly 

two dozen opposition parties who pledged to oust the 

BJP government and “confront and defeat the forces 

that   are   subverting   our   constitution   and   making   a  

mockery of our democracy”. 

Reuters

Heartland turns hurtland

Congress 

workers in 

Bhopal 

celebrating the 

party’s victory in 

the assembly 

elections in 

Madhya Pradesh. 

P

H

O

T

O

:

 

E

P

A

INDIA

 

tabla

!

December 14, 2018

Page 3

Page 1
background image

ZUBIN SHROFF

In January 2011, when Michael 

Clarke was named the new Aus-

tralian captain in place of Ricky 

Ponting, he announced his retire-

ment from Twenty20 cricket to con-

centrate on the longer versions of the 

game. 

Fourteen of his 28 Test hundreds came thereafter – 

between 2011 and 2015 – including his highest Test 

score of 329 not out versus India in Sydney.

In the case of Cheteshwar Pujara, it was a simple is-

sue of him not being endowed with anything that 

would make him “look good” on TV. No athletic de-

meanour, no trendy beard, no ponytail, no funky tat-

toos. 

His batting, at times, is even less exciting to watch 

than grass growing. This was patently visible in the In-

dian Premier League games he participated. 

And yet, the greatness of his game lies in his humble 

acceptance of who he is and his commitment to stay 

true to his style – along with his immense powers of 

concentration.

It is that lost skill of batting in Tests that proved once 

again last week how valuable it can be in difficult situa-

tions. It’s where a batsman’s strength is not his boom-

ing cover drive, but his meticulous judgement in leav-

ing balls outside the off-stump.

India made history on Monday by winning a tour-

opening Test in Australia. It is their 10th visit Down Un-

der and their sixth win overall in 41 attempts there. It 

could not have happened if it weren’t for one man: Pu-

jara.

If Rahul Dravid was called “The Wall”, I would like 

to call Pujara “The Anchor”.

Once again India started a Test series with little 

preparation and were five wickets down for less than 

100 runs in the first innings of the first Test of an over-

seas tour this year. But that is where the script changed 

this time round in Adelaide.

Pujara was like King Leonidas leading 300 Spar-

tans to war against a Persian Army of 300,000. Or at 

least that is how it must felt to him at 41-4 with Pat 

Cummins, Josh Hazlewood and Mitchell Starc in full 

flight and with only the middle and lower order for 

company.

While everyone around him was swashbuckling 

their way back to the pavilion, he remained calm, col-

lected and resolute. Slowly but surely he wore down 

the opposition.

His effort in the first innings lasted 246 balls and 

yielded 123 runs – almost half of his team’s score of 

250. His match returns of 194 runs came from a stag-

gering 393 balls, almost a third of the total faced by his 

team-mates in the Test.

It was his partnerships of 45 with Rohit Sharma 

(37), 41 with Rishabh Pant (25) and 62 with R. Ashwin 

(25) that ensured India got out of jail and scored 250 – 

giving their bowlers something to work with.

Picking four bowlers in the side to me is less conser-

vative and more fraught with risk. It needs all of them 

to be on top of their game and at least one of them to be 

the workhorse – which is difficult to sustain in a four- or 

five-T est series. 

But, once again, the Indian bowling unit responded 

magnificently, as they have done all year round.

Ishant Sharma has been a revelation this year. His 

33 wickets in nine Tests at an average of 22.03 and a 

strike rate of 49.27 is a far cry from a career average of 

34.7 and a strike rate of 64.91. 

He is troubling top-order batsmen and bowling im-

maculate lines with radar-like accuracy.

Jasprit Bumrah is robotic. He is “mechanical effi-

ciency” combined with high levels of intelligence. If 

his body can hold up, one will see him win many more 

matches for India. 

He is also a keen student of the game with a very ma-

ture head. This makes him, in my opinion, a leadership 

candidate in the future.

The pick of the Indian bowlers was Ashwin. As 

much as I would love to see him in a more attacking 

role – conceding a few more runs and probably taking 

five wickets or more, he responded to his skipper’s de-

mand to bowl tight with incredible professionalism 

and delivered great results.

I don’t think taking wickets was his job description 

for this Test as much as it was keeping one end plugged. 

So, any criticism of his numbers, particularly in the 

wickets column, is unwarranted.

Bowling 86.5 overs in two innings, with 22 maidens 

and giving away only 1.72 runs per over to pick 6-149 

in the match is nothing short of a herculean effort.

However, I don’t think this is sustainable, and, more 

importantly, I do not believe it is what Ashwin is best 

meant to do. He is a match winner and needs to be 

given the same latitude as given to Nathan Lyon, his op-

posite number.

Unfortunately for India, Ashwin won’t figure in the 

second Test, starting in Perth today, as he has a side in-

jury. Rohit is also out with a back injury.

Thanks in large part to Ashwin’s effort, India were 

able to make up for the disappointment of Mohammed 

Shami’s indifferent form in the first Test. 

The medium-pacer just does not look the part. His 

bowling is mostly inconsistent with intermittent 

flashes of brilliance. His batting is an atrocious effort to 

say the least, and he looks like he doesn’t care.

I am surprised he even made it into the XI ahead of 

Bhuvneshwar Kumar. 

Having taken a lead of 15 runs in the first innings, 

one that had more of a psychological bearing, India 

needed to do a lot better in the second innings if they 

were going to win the Test. 

Lokesh Rahul got out playing a terrible shot six 

short of what could have been a good 50. You think he 

would have learnt something watching Rohit throw 

away a similar start of 37 in the first innings.

What was good, however, was to see everyone that 

followed in the top-order willing to fight it out.

Kohli’s was a patient knock of 34, while Pujara was 

“The Anchor” once again. It was most heartening to 

see Ajinkya Rahane finding form and playing “the 

shot of the match” – cover driving Cummins to the 

boundary.

He is the vice-captain and his form is going to be vi-

tal to India’s chances in the series. It also takes a whole 

lot of pressure off Kohli – which in turn will allow Kohli 

to score more freely. 

India’s overall lead of 322 was eventually enough, 

but only just, with the Australians getting to within 31 

runs off the target, thanks mainly to the rearguard. 

The contribution from India’s lower order of Ash-

win, Shami, Ishant and Bumrah was incredibly discon-

certing. They scored 35 runs in the first innings and 

only five in the second. 

Compare that to what the Australians produced – 

Cummins, Starc, Lyon and Hazlewood totalled 49 in 

the first innings and 107 in the second. 

This has been the story all-year round: Either it is 

the Indian tail that can’t bat to save their lives or their 

bowlers are unable to wrap up the opponents’ lower or-

der quickly. 

To me such a vast gap in runs will continue to hurt In-

dia and cost them games unless something is done 

about it immediately.

I had said that the Adelaide and Sydney pitches 

would offer India the best chances to win in this series 

in Australia. The Perth Test will be tough but India can 

do well given that they have started on a winning note.

Despite missing the experienced David Warner 

and Steve Smith in their batting line-up, the Aus-

tralians have given an incredible account of their fight-

ing abilities. Things will start to get more interesting if 

their top order starts to fire. I am hoping they will do so 

sooner rather than later for it will make for more en-

thralling contests between the two sides.

The Adelaide match showed how important it is to 

have top skills to play Test cricket. What a great adver-

tisement it was for my favourite format of this amazing 

game. 

tabla@sph.com.sg

Zubin Shroff, a former national captain, is the 

chairman of selectors of the Singapore men’s teams.

A win 

for Test 

cricket

Indian batsman 

Cheteshwar 

Pujara stood like 

a rock in both 

innings, which 

helped India to 

win the first Test 

against Australia 

in Adelaide. 

P

H

O

T

O

:

 

E

P

A

Page16

December14,2018

tabla

!

 

SPORTS

PublishedandprintedbySingaporePressHoldingsLimited.Co.Regn.No.

198402868E.AmemberofAuditBureauofCirculationsSingapore.CustomerService(Circulation):

6388-3838,circs@sph.com.sg,Fax

6746-1925.

Thumbnail View
Close
Swipe LEFT or RIGHT
About the Publisher
Content
Tabla! Newspaper
Company
Singapore Press Holdings
Website
www.tabla.com.sg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. Co
ArchiveClose
Thu 13 Dec 2018
Thu 06 Dec 2018
Fri 30 Nov 2018
Fri 23 Nov 2018