Page 1
background image

FOODIE 

Fiesta

FOODIE 

MCI (P) 078/03/2019

SINGAPORE, WEEKEND OF FRIDAY, 

MAY 17, 2019

‘I’M THE ORIGINAL, 

MODI’S MY 

LOOKALIKE’

PAGE 4

 

SHAHID: PLAYING 

KABIR WAS 

CHALLENGING 

PAGE 11

SHANKAR 

HOPES TO PROVE 

CRITICS WRONG 

PAGE 20

Get tabla

!

 delivered to your doorstep. 

Call 6319-1800 or e-mail circs@sph.com.sg. 

Catch us online at www.tabla.com.sg

Singaporean Ruby Shekhar has built a worldwide 

community of almost 12,000 sari lovers

Facebook

Sari Queen

FROM PAGES 16 TO 19

Web: www.kailashparbat.com.sg

Email: admin@kailashparbat.com.sg

HOME

DELIVERY

D eli v ery

:

64

44

34

44

fo r

THE WORLD’S

FAVOURITE CHAAT

dining destination

&

Ms Ruby Shekhar (left) and followers of Demure Drapes Facebook page celebrating Singapore’s bicentennial. 

P

H

O

T

O

S

:

 

P

A

N

N

E

E

R

 

C

H

E

L

V

A

M

,

 

J

.

 

T

H

I

A

N

 

P

H

O

T

O

REPORT ON PAGES 6 & 7

Page 1
background image

Museum on Mughals, war 

memorial to open in Red Fort

A museum displaying the government’s 

historical and rare collections of 

Mughal antiquities and the Indian War 

Memorial will soon add to the array of 

British barrack buildings, redeveloped 

as museums, in the Red Fort in Delhi. It 

could open by 2019 end.

The announcement, coming ahead 

of the International Museum Day on 

May 18, was made by leading art 

gallery DAG, which won the bidding 

conducted by the Archaeological 

Survey of India.

India to extend ban on LTTE

The Indian government has extended 

for another five years its ban on the 

Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam 

(LTTE), which assassinated former 

Indian Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi in 

1991, it was announced on Tuesday.

“The LTTE’s continued violent and 

disruptive activities are prejudicial to 

the integrity and sovereignty of India; 

and it continues to adopt a strong 

anti-India posture and pose a grave 

threat to the security of Indian 

nationals,” the announcement said.

The LTTE, which was described as a 

militant and political organisation, has 

been blamed for the May 1991 suicide 

bombing at an election rally near 

Chennai which killed Rajiv Gandhi and 

several others, prompting one of the 

biggest crackdowns in India.

Tension in Kolkata as election 

violence breaks out

 

Clashes broke out in Kolkata on 

Tuesday evening as the mega rally of 

Bharatiya Janata Party president Amit 

Shah passed through the north Kolkata 

neighbourhood. 

According to eye witnesses, the 

clashes were triggered after students 

presumably from the Trinamool 

Congress’ students’ wing of Vidyasagar 

College held up “Go back, Amit Shah” 

posters when his roadshow passed the 

college. 

The first floor hall of the college was 

ransacked and at least three 

motorcycles were set on fire. Several 

people, mostly Trinamool Congress 

supporters, were injured.

At least 300 Himalayan yaks 

starve to death

Indian officials said that at least 300 

yaks (a large domesticated wild ox) 

starved to death in a remote Himalayan 

valley after a bout of unusually harsh 

winter weather.

Officials in Sikkim said they received 

the first distress call from 50 people in 

the remote Mukuthang Valley in 

December last year. 

Following very heavy snowfall the 

residents asked for help providing feed 

for their herd of around 1,500 yaks, a 

source of local milk, milk products, 

transportation and wool.

Local official Raj Kumar Yadav said 

several attempts to reach them were 

made but it was impossible because of 

the weather conditions. 

Local families have reported the 

deaths of 500 yaks due to starvation, 

while 50 yaks are receiving urgent 

medical attention. 

Glucose, milk poured into Yamuna

Environment activists in Agra 

symbolically poured glucose and milk 

into the “dying and sick” Yamuna river 

in Agra to raise awareness about the 

chronic pollution plaguing the river.

Several members of the River 

Connect Campaign gathered by the 

Yamuna to express their concern for the 

sacred river, considered to be almost 

“dead” due to pollutants and effluents.

They offered boxes of glucose and 

milk to “Yamuna Maiyya” (mother 

Yamuna) on the occasion of Mothers’ 

Day. 

It was also aimed at showing their 

affinity and bonding with the lifeline of 

the historic city.

“Unfortunately, the river has been 

reduced to a vast sewage canal,” social 

activist Shravan Kumar Singh said.

Grenade blast in Assam

At least 10 people were wounded in a 

grenade explosion in Assam on Wednes-

day but no militant group has so far 

claimed responsibility for the attack, po-

lice said.

“It was a grenade blast probably tar-

geted against security personnel con-

ducting routine patrols in the area,” 

said Deepak Kumar, police commis-

sioner in Assam’s capital Guwahati.

The blast in a busy street in Guwa-

hati occurred at night and those injured 

included two police officers and eight 

civilians. 

For editiorial matters, 

write to us at 

tabla@sph.com.sg

For advertising enquiries, 

write to 

mariatio@sph.com.sg

Talk to us at 

6319-5510

For home delivery, call 

6319-1800

(Mon to Fri 9am to 6pm)

or e-mail 

circs@sph.com.sg

Advertise with us by calling 

9171-4327 or 6319-2068

Catch us online at

www.tabla.com.sg

Published by 

Singapore Press Holdings

Editor-in-Chief

(English/Malay/Tamil Media group)

Warren Fernandez

Editor

Jawharilal Rajendran

Contributing Editor

V.K. Santosh Kumar

Marketing Team Head

Bernard Ong

‘Art of camouflage

A photograph of a snow leopard clicked by 

wildlife photographer Saurabh Desai has 

gone viral on social media after many 

netizens found it hard to spot the animal on 

a rocky mountain with patches of snow.

Mr Desai, who clicked the photograph 

during his visit to the Spiti Valley in 

Himachal Pradesh, shared the image on his 

Instagram account with the caption “Art of 

camouflage”.

The image soon went viral, garnering 

over 14,000 likes. Many netizens found it 

difficult to spot the camouflaged leopard and 

challenged their friends to do the same.

Mr Desai visited the Kibber village, 

believed to be the highest motorable village 

in the world, and caught a glimpse of the 

snow leopard 8km from the village.

P

H

O

T

O

:

 

I

A

N

S

Page2

May17,2019

tabla

!

 

INDIA

Page 1
background image

Cheap tools help parties bypass WhatsApp

WhatsApp clones and software tools 

that cost as little as Rs1,000 ($19.50) 

are helping Indian digital marketers and 

political activists bypass anti-spam re-

strictions set up by the world’s most pop-

ular messaging app, Reuters has found. 

The activities   highlight  the  chal-

lenges WhatsApp, which is owned by 

Facebook, faces in preventing abuse in 

India, its biggest market with more than 

200 million users.

With fervent campaigning in India’s 

staggered general election, which con-

cludes on Sunday, the demand for such 

tools has surged, according to digital 

companies and sources in the ruling 

Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) and its 

main rival, the Congress. 

After false messages on WhatsApp 

last year sparked mob lynchings in In-

dia, the company restricted forwarding 

of a message to only five users. 

The software tools appear to over-

come those restrictions, allowing users 

to reach thousands of people at once.

Ms Divya Spandana, the social me-

dia chief of the Congress, and the BJP’s 

IT head Amit Malviya did not respond 

to requests for comment. 

Mr Rohitash Repswal, who owns a 

digital   marketing   business   in   a  

cramped, residential neighbourhood of 

New Delhi, said he ran a Rs1,000 piece 

of software round-the-clock in recent 

months to send up to 100,000 What-

sApp messages a day for two BJP mem-

bers.

“Whatever WhatsApp does, there’s 

a workaround,” Mr Repswal said.

Reuters found WhatsApp was mis-

used in at least three ways in India for 

political campaigning: Free clone apps 

available online were used by some BJP 

and Congress workers to manually for-

ward messages on a mass basis; soft-

ware tools which allow users to auto-

mate delivery of WhatsApp messages; 

and some firms offering political work-

ers the chance to go onto a website and 

send bulk WhatsApp messages from 

anonymous numbers. 

At least three software tools were 

available on Amazon.com’s India web-

site. 

When purchased by a Reuters re-

porter, they arrived as compact discs 

tucked inside thin cardboard casings, 

with no company branding. 

WhatsApp declined a Reuters re-

quest to allow testing such tools for re-

porting this story. 

“We are continuing to step up our en-

forcement against imposter WhatsApp 

services and take legal action by send-

ing cease and desist letters to hundreds 

of bulk messaging service providers to 

help curb abuse,” a spokeswoman said.

“We do not want them to operate on 

our platform and we work to ban 

them”. 

Modified versions of popular apps 

have become common as technically-

savvy hobbyists have long reverse-engi-

neered them. 

Tools purporting to bypass What-

sApp   restrictions   are   advertised   in  

videos and online forums aimed at 

users in Indonesia and Nigeria, both of 

which held major elections this year.

For Indian politicians, WhatsApp, 

Facebook and Twitter are key campaign-

ing tools to target the country’s near 

900 million voters.

Two Congress sources and one BJP 

source told Reuters that their workers 

used clone apps such as “GBWhat-

sApp” and “JTWhatsApp”, which al-

lowed them to cut through WhatsApp’s 

restrictions.

Both apps have a green-colour inter-

face that closely resembles WhatsApp 

and can be downloaded for free from 

dozens of technology blogs. 

They are not available on Google’s of-

ficial app store but work on Android 

phones. 

WhatsApp describes such apps as 

“unofficial” and says its users can face 

bans, which means the company can 

block the account associated with a par-

ticular mobile number if it detects un-

usual activity. 

Some Congress workers said they 

did not care. 

“WhatsApp occasionally bans some 

of these numbers, but the volunteers 

will use new (mobile) sim cards to sign 

up,” said a Congress member.

In Mumbai, a person in the social me-

dia team of a senior BJP candidate said 

no restrictions on JTWhatsApp meant 

his team could easily send forwards to 

up to 6,000 people a day, as well as 

video files containing political content 

which would be far bigger in size than 

allowed on the official WhatsApp ser-

vice.

Reuters was not able to ascertain the 

overall scale  of   such activities  and 

found no evidence that BJP and Con-

gress leaders officially ordered workers 

to campaign this way. 

Mr Repswal said he would typically 

charge Rs150,000 for a month’s service 

for creating digital content, providing a 

database of mobile numbers and then 

sending 300,000 WhatsApp messages. 

He uses a piece of software named 

“Business Sender” which he said he 

also sells for Rs1,000. A person can add 

many mobile numbers in a field and 

compose messages with pictures. 

Using a so-called “Group Contacts 

Grabber” feature, the user can also ex-

tract a list of mobile numbers from a par-

ticular WhatsApp group with a click of 

a button. 

Mr Repswal didn’t name the two 

BJP members he worked for, but in a 

demonstration   for   Reuters,   added  

dozens of mobile numbers in the soft-

ware, typed a test message saying “your 

vote is your right” and hit “send”. 

Then, his WhatsApp web version 

started delivering the messages almost 

robotically, one after the other.

Business Sender was “not supported 

or endorsed” by WhatsApp and was de-

veloped by “Tiger Vikram Mysore IN-

DIA”, its system properties said. 

A member of the software support 

team at Business Sender, Mr Rajesh K., 

declined to identify the developer by 

his real name, but said the tool was de-

signed in Lebanon about four months 

ago and takes advantage of what he 

called a “loophole” in WhatsApp’s sys-

tem. 

“This is not rocket science or fabri-

cated software,” said Mr Rajesh.

“There are hundreds of such soft-

ware available.” 

Last month, when a Reuters reporter 

responded to a text message with an 

“Election Special”  offer  of  sending  

100,000“bulk   WhatsApp”   messages  

for Rs7,999, he was invited to an office 

in a dusty industrial area of Noida in 

northern Uttar Pradesh state.

“How many messages you want to 

send, tell us: 10,000, 1 million, 2 mil-

lion,” a representative asked, while 

showing a black-coloured, password-

protected website they use for sending 

bulk WhatsApp messages.

Reuters

“This is 

not rocket 

science or 

fabricated 

software. 

There are 

hundreds 

of such 

software 

available.” 

– A member of 

the software 

support team 

at Business 

Sender, 

Mr Rajesh K.

Digital marketer Rohitash Repswal checking a message that he sent using a software tool 

that automates the process of sending messages to WhatsApp users. 

P

H

O

T

O

:

 

R

E

U

T

E

R

S

INDIA

 

tabla

!

May17,2019

Page3

Page 1
background image

Vijay Shankar’s selection as India’s No. 

4 batsman for the World Cup has trig-

gered   the   biggest   debate   to   engulf   In-

dian cricket in recent times. 

Many former cricketers and pundits 

believe that Ambati Rayudu or Rishabh 

Pant would have been a better option. 

They may have a point as Shankar’s 

performance in the recently-concluded 

Indian Premier League was pathetic. 

He   scored   219   runs   in   14   matches  

for Sunrisers Hyderabad and took only 

one wicket in an under-utilised bowling 

stint.

On the other hand, Pant scored 488 

runs   in   16   games   for   Delhi   Capitals,  

with an average of 37.53. 

The   wicketkeeper-batsman   also  

played a crucial role in propelling Delhi 

to the playoffs as his blistering knock of 

49   runs   off   21   balls   helped   eliminate  

the Sunrisers.

But then India’s selectors clearly feel 

that Shankar fits the bill as he is “three-

dimensional”– capable of good batting, 

bowling and fielding.

Interestingly,   criticism   and   Shankar  

have a history. 

Not many cricket fans in India would 

have   forgotten   the   all-rounder’s   strug-

gle   against   Bangladesh   in   the   final   of  

the   Nidahas   Trophy   in   Sri   Lanka   last  

year.

He   was   roundly   “hated”   on   social  

media   after   he   struggled   with   the   bat  

during  India’s chase and ended with  a 

19-ball 17.

Even   though   India   won   the   match,  

Shankar was made to relive the horror 

of his innings again and again by the me-

dia and fans. 

But every dark cloud has a silver lin-

ing.

Shankar told IANS that the incident 

was a “life lesson” and one that made 

him   a   stronger   human   being   who   re-

alised   the   importance   of   enjoying   the  

moment and not putting too much pres-

sure on himself on the cricket field. 

He also said that not many realised 

that it was his first outing with the bat as 

an India player.

“I would definitely say the Nidahas 

Trophy was a life-changing experience  

as a cricketer. It has been a year and ev-

eryone knows what happened and how 

difficult it was,” he said. 

“I   would   have   easily   attended   50  

phone   calls   from   all   over   India.   The  

press people kept calling me and asked 

me the same question. 

“Even the social media and all was a 

little difficult for me. I felt a little disap-

pointed and it took me some time to get 

out of that zone. 

“But it taught me how to come out 

of   that,   I   learnt   how   to   handle   situa-

tions. That incident showed me that one 

bad   day   isn’t   the   end   of   the   world.   It  

hasn’t happened only to me, it has hap-

pened   to   many   top   players   over   the  

years. 

“The best thing is that it happened in 

my first outing with the bat for India. I 

had bowled in the series, but that was 

the first time I went in to bat. 

“I didn’t realise what happened right 

then, but that was a life lesson. It taught 

me   to   enjoy   every   moment   as   things  

like that are temporary and I must focus 

on giving my 100 per cent.” 

On the much debated batting slot for 

the World Cup, which starts in England 

and   Wales,   on   May   30,   Shankar   has  

learnt to de-stress and not get bothered 

by what is being said bout him. 

For him, it is the team management 

that counts.

“I had a decent run when I batted at 

No. 3 in the T20 series in New Zealand 

(earlier this year). The most important 

thing is that the team management has 

shown trust in me and believe I can do 

the   job.   That   gives   you   extra   motiva-

tion,” he said.

“The need of the team is my priority 

and I am always ready to adapt to situa-

tions and conditions.

“I am enjoying myself and don’t put 

any   pressure   on   myself.   I   like   to   read  

the   situation   and   play   accordingly.   I  

give   importance   to   work   ethics   and  

there is no short cut.”

Shankar’s  main   competitors   for   the  

No.   4   spot   are   Lokesh   Rahul   and   Di-

nesh   Karthik.   Both   outclassed   him   in  

IPL 2019.

Shankar   has   the   gift   of   timing   the  

ball with precision but lacks the aerial 

ability to clear the ball over the stands.

The   all-rounder   may   help   to  

strengthen   India’s   bowling   attack   in  

England’s seaming condition. However, 

the   team’s   leading   all-rounder   Hardik  

Pandya is in sensational form.

Shankar said that he has been work-

ing on his bowling.

“I   have   been   working   a   lot   on   my  

bowling   and   I   am   someone   who   be-

lieves in keeping the process right,” he 

said. 

“I   feel   that   if   the   situation   arises,  

when the skipper hands me the ball, I  

should   be   confident   that   I   can   do   the  

job   and   only   then   will   that   translate  

into performance. It is all about gaining 

in confidence with every given opportu-

nity.”

Indo-Asian News Service

Vijay Shankar playing a shot during the Indian Premier League eliminator against Delhi Capitals. 

P

H

O

T

O

:

 

A

F

P

‘Three-dimensional’ Shankar

hopes to prove critics wrong

Page 20

May 17, 2019

tabla

!

 

SPORTS

Published and printed by Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Co. Regn. No.

198402868E. A member of Audit Bureau of Circulations Singapore. Customer Service (Circulation):

6388-3838, circs@sph.com.sg, Fax

6746-1925.

Thumbnail View
Close
Swipe LEFT or RIGHT
About the Publisher
Content
Tabla! Newspaper
Company
Singapore Press Holdings
Website
www.tabla.com.sg
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. Co
ArchiveClose
Thu 16 May 2019
Thu 09 May 2019
Thu 02 May 2019
Thu 25 Apr 2019