background image

terms of languages spoken, technology education

and adaptability in disparate environments.

“With the millions of Indians now going to

school and getting skilled, India is the largest provid-

er of engineers (more than half a million annually)

and English-speaking professionals in the world.”

With the middle-class population in excess of

300 million, India is the largest market for cars,

high-value foods, mobile phones etc, ahead of or

just behind China.

“This turnaround has happened as education lev-

els have gone up – nearly

98 per cent of children are

enrolled in primary schools now,” says Dr Khan.

“Also because of the fall in fertility rates, an aver-

age Indian family now has fewer than three children

compared to five a couple of decades ago, leading

to increased expense on education and health per

child.”

The dependency ratio

Demographic acceleration and deceleration have

huge impacts on a country’s economic performance,

and that’s where the secret lies in understanding

why India’s population boom is a boon.

“The dependency ratio (the ratio of the popula-

tion outside the working age group relative to the

population in the working age group) is the key,”

says MD and head of Asia (regional) Research &

Economics at Maybank Kim Eng Holdings, Singa-

pore, Prasenjit K. Basu. “As the dependency ratio

falls, a nation’s savings rate typically rises (as long

as those of working age are mostly employed!). If

the nation’s savings rate rises, so should its

investment/GDP ratio, and a rise in the latter boosts

productivity and therefore prosperity. This is the

virtuous circle that Japan entered in the

1950-90 pe-

riod (when its dependency ratio was steadily declin-

ing), and Korea did from

1965-2010, China from

1978-2013 (the dependency ratio there is going to

start rising from next year). And India is in the mid-

dle of its demographic dividend phase (the period of

declining dependency ratios) which will last from

1990 to

2035.”

A boon turning out to be a bane?

However, not all economists see India’s burgeoning

population as a boon.

“The demographic dividend that we talk about is

actually turning out to be a bane for India, because

of lack of skill or employability on part of the Indi-

an labour force,” argues professor at Institute for Fi-

nancial Management and Research, Chennai Area,

India, Dr Nilanjan Banik. “Consider this. In the pri-

vate sector, approximately

10 to

15 million jobs

were created in

2011-12 but not all could not be

filled up as

75 per cent of these jobs required skills

such as vocational training which are not to be

found among the prospective applicants. Be it doc-

tors, engineers, or even MBA graduates, there is a

dearth of quality professionals in India.

“This is precisely why every year corporations

like Infosys (service), ITC (manufactured consumer

items), Apollo (medical), and L&T (engineering), to

name a few, are left with vacant seats, or prefer to

recruit people with foreign degrees, rather than em-

ploy graduates from India.”

Says executive director, Bharti Institute of Public

Policy, and Clinical Associate Professor, Indian

School of Business, Mohali, Punjab, Dr Rajesh

Chakrabarti: “This year’s Economic Survey puts

the jobs question at the forefront and for all the

right reasons. It is not clear if India will be able to

create the kind of jobs in sufficient numbers to em-

ploy its millions.”

Says assistant professor, Indian Institute of For-

eign Trade, New Delhi, Dr Debashis Chakraborty:

“The point is a higher number cannot be sustained

as a boon. There needs to be skill formation for

smooth progression and human development aug-

mentation has a crucial role there.”

What can be done?

“In this regard, Indian policymakers should take a

lesson from the growth performance of the newly in-

dustrialised economies in Asia, such as Taiwan,

South Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong, which is typi-

cally driven by designing curriculum, so that more

people can be employed,” says Dr Banik. “In India,

on the other hand, government regulation in higher

education is actually hindering supply of quality ed-

ucation.”

Says Dr Chakraborty, “What India needs is rapid

skill development to ready its growing population

for the marketplace for jobs. That is the critical chal-

lenge.”

“India now will have to make a call whether it

wants to be a manufacturing hub (like China) or ser-

vice hub (like Singapore)?” he says. “Once we are

ourselves clear on that front, appropriate education

and training policies can be devised to reap demo-

graphic dividend.”

These arguments are in line with a report, State

Of The Urban Youth, India

2012: Employment,

Livelihoods, Skills, published by IRIS Knowledge

Foundation in collaboration with UN-HABITAT.

The report suggests that unequal access to oppor-

tunity and the lack of emphasis on education re-

mains a persistent problem in India. While the coun-

try is undergoing a demographic transition, regional

disparities in education mean the benefits will not

be evenly spread across the country. That, if one

may say, is the fine irony of India’s population

boon.

tabla@sph.com.sg

Zafar Anjum is a Singapore-based journalist and

writer.

FROM PAGE

1

Boon

or

bane?

Crowded...

India’s cities

such as

Mumbai are

densely

populated and

growing by the

minute.

Commuters

hope that new

metro lines

(left) will help

ease traffic

woes.

PHOTO:

©

AFP

India is currently the second most populous country

in the world, with over

1.21 billion people

(2011

census) – this represents more than a sixth of the world’s

population.

Every third person in an Indian city today is a youth.

India is projected to be the world’s most populous

country by

2025, surpassing China. Its population will

reach

1.6 billion by

2050.

More than

50 per cent of India’s population is below

the age of

25 and more than

65 per cent is below

35.

By

2020, India is set to become the world’s youngest

country with

64 per cent of its population in the

working age group.

In about seven years, the median individual age in

India will be

29 years.

The population in the age-group of

15-34 increased

from

353 million in

2001 to

430 million in

2011.

Current predictions suggest a steady increase in the

youth population to

464 million by

2021 and finally a

decline to

458 million by

2026.

India is set to experience a dynamic transformation as

the population burden of the past turns into a

demographic dividend, but the benefits will be tempered

with social and spatial inequalities – according to a

report, State Of The Urban Youth, India

2012:

Employment, Livelihoods, Skills, published by IRIS

Knowledge Foundation in collaboration with

UN-HABITAT.

The report says the southern and western states will

be the first to experience a growth dividend as they

accounted for

63 per cent of all formally trained people.

The largest share of youth with formal skills was found

in Kerala, followed by Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu,

Himachal Pradesh and Gujarat. Among those

undergoing training, Maharashtra had the highest share,

Bihar the lowest.

India’s population at a glance

tabla

!

May

24,

2013

Page

6

 

tabla

!

May

24,

2013

Page

7

INDIA