background image

I

F EVERY published book is a little

work of miracle, then Anees Salim’s

The Blind Lady’s Descendants de-

serves to be called a miracle of miracles.

Rejected by many publishers for years, re-

cently this book by the Kerala-based writ-

er has made it to the top of the literary

heap in India – it was honoured with the

Crossword Book Award in Indian fiction

2014.

For those who don’t know Anees, he is

the author of four novels and the winner

of The Hindu Literary Prize 2013 for his

novel, Vanity Bagh. Besides the two

award-winning novels, his other works in-

clude The Vicks Mango Tree and Tales

From A Vending Machine.

“I started writing this book shortly after

my first manuscript fetched me a few rejec-

tion mails,” reminisces Anees in a piece in

Scroll.in. “I had just landed my first job

and I was living hand to mouth on the top

floor of a rundown hotel. The floor had on-

ly three rooms besides mine but they were

always uninhabited, so I had practically

the whole floor to myself, complete with

the luxury of a spacious terrace, a pretty

view of the city and pin-drop silence

throughout the night.

“Halfway through the manuscript I

learned why the rent was ridiculously low:

the previous tenant had ended his life in

the room by hanging himself

from the ceiling fan,” he contin-

ues.

“Talk about coincidences:

I wrote the first draft of The

Blind Lady’s Descendants, which

is actually a long suicide note of

a 26-year-old, in a room where

someone had killed himself.

I wrote most of the early version

of this book with an eye on the

ceiling, shuddering at the lightest sound.”

There was one more ominous thing at-

tached to this novel, says Anees. There is a

character called Javi in the book – a young

man who takes his life at the age of 26, the

same day Amar, the protagonist of the nov-

el, is born. “I chose this name for him be-

cause it was the shorter version of Javed,

the name of my favourite nephew,” writes

Anees. “One early morning seven months

ago, my writing was interrupted by a tele-

phone call. Nothing made sense for a

while, then the news slowly

sank in. My nephew had taken

his life a while ago, but he had

not left a suicide note, much un-

like his namesake.”

There are a lot of curious

things about the Varkala-born

Anees, who now works in Ko-

chi as a creative director of

FCB Ulka. All his novels were

rejected by publishers until he

sent his manuscript to a Del-

hi-based agent, Kanishka Gupta. He

sent it pretending to be a girl who man-

aged vending machines. Kanishka, a

very good writer-turned-lit agent, was

hooked after reading his manuscript

and one by one, all his novels were

picked up by leading publishers in In-

dia. This is the stuff of literary legends.

The Patna Manual Of Style

From Kerala, we now move to Patna in

Bihar. The other book that is making

waves is Siddharth Chowdhury’s The

Patna Manual Of Style (2015). It is a set

of interlinked stories that brings back

many characters that have appeared in

his previous books, namely Diksha at

St. Martins (Srishti, 2002) and Patna

Roughcut (Picador, 2005), and Day

Scholar (2010).

Siddharth, a Bengali from Bihar who

lives in New Delhi, eschews the new

world of communication completely:

No Facebook, Twitter, book launches

and litfests for him. He writes the first

three drafts of any work in longhand.

Even for an interview for a website, he

sent in his handwritten (photocopied) re-

sponses by courier to the interviewer,

and answered only a couple of fol-

low-up questions via SMS. “I see Patna

Roughcut, Day Scholar and The Patna

Manual of Style as part of one big novel

that I am working towards. In that sense

it is unfinished,” he said in a recent inter-

view.

tabla@sph.com.sg

Zafar Anjum is a Singapore-based

writer who runs a literary start-up,

kitaab.org. Follow @zafaranjum on

Twitter. tabla

!

reads is a monthly

column on books, writing and

publishing.

NEEL Mukherjee’s The Lives

Of Others has won the Encore

Award for the Best Second

Novel in the UK. “We were

immensely impressed by the

ambition and depth of Neel

Mukherjee’s second novel, in

which a suburban house in

1960s Calcutta comes to

reflect the political and social

convulsions of an entire

society,” said Alex Clark,

Chair of the Encore Judges.

“Ranging

from the

mass hunger

of the Second

World

War to

independence

and the

emergence

of the Maoist Naxalbari

movement, Mukherjee

chronicles these extraordinary

years in Indian history

through the piercingly

observed story of one

family.”

On being presented with

his award, Neel Mukherjee

said: “The Encore Award is

the coolest and the most

original literary prize in town.

It is a burst of light in what is

usually considered to be dark,

damp, bleak territory – the

dreaded second novel. I’m

thrilled by my good fortune

and, looking at the list of past

winners, both humbled and

deeply honoured.”

WHENEVER I hear of very

young people turning authors,

I am pleasantly surprised.

These are sensitive souls

trapped in a child’s body. In

Singapore, we have one such

young talent in Ananya

Sengupta (below). Her

collection of poems, Drowning

Dreams And Other Poems,

has been published by a

young writers’ association

called

Timbuktoo.

Ananya was

11, studying

in Grade 5 at

the United

World

College of

Southeast

Asia,

Singapore

when she

wrote these

poems that

now form her first book. Now

12, she continues to write.

The publisher of

Timbuktoo, Aparna, is all

praise for the young writer:

“In Ananya’s poems there is a

rare poignancy that is usually

expressed by those who have

seen the world. Coming from

one so young, the display of

both naivete and wonder with

seasoned empathy is often

moving. And yet, the mood is

not all grey.”

We wish her great success

as a writer!

Anees Salim’s

miracle

Best-selling Kerala writer

had manuscripts rejected

by several publishers

before success dawned

Pretended to be a girl... (above) Anees

Salim and his book. (Below) Siddharth

Chowdhury and his book.

Neel

wins

UK

award

Young

Ananya’s

dreams

Page 4

May 22, 2015

tabla

!

 

tabla

!

May 22, 2015

Page 5

NEWS